Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:39 am


Luzzi could see the slugs of the "double-O" buckshot rip a hole through sheetrock. The metallic click of the pump action shotgun could be heard above the gunfire as Luzzi ejected the spent shell and pumped another load into the receiver of the Ithaca.

The gunman reeled back under the intense volley of fire as he disappeared again into his room. An eerie silence hung over the basement as the blood pounded in the ears of the cops. . The smell of cordite and clouds of gunsmoke filled the enclosed staircase.

The Sergeant cursed to himself for not carrying his backup gun. He always carried his off-duty .38 revolver, but on this rainy night, he had left it in his locker. He had been a patrol cop in the 71st Precinct in Crown Heights for years and wouldn't turn out without that backup gun. He had two speedloaders on his gunbelt and he kept his eyes fixed on the doorway as he quickly snapped the leather case open.

His years of experience and training served him well as his thumb flicked the ejection rod of his service revolver and the shell casings flew out of the chambers. His eyes darted up and down as he tried to insert the speedloader into the cylinder.

The semi-waddcutters of the high-velocity .38 caliber ammunition were slow to align into each of the six chambers. He felt the rounds slide into the cylinder and quickly snapped the cylinder shut. Out of habit, he backed the hammer up and twirled the cylinder to ensure that the weapon wouldn't jam.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:40 am


Reinhold yelled up to Luzzi to throw him some ammo. Luzzi threw some .38 caliber speedloaders down the stairs. Luzzi could see the Sergeant grab the ammunition and dart back away from the landing.

When he saw Reinhold's arm, he saw blood all over his shirt and he was sure that the Sergeant was wounded. They later learned that the blood was from the gunshot wound to the father that was all over the landing.

Luzzi shouted: "Are you hit?"

Sergeant Reinhold yelled back "I don't know!" as he examined himself in disbelief.

Reinhold crouched again with his service revolver in the two-handed supported position and stared intently down the barrel of the weapon.

Suddenly, he caught sight of the shooter through the partially opened door. The armed male saw the Sergeant at the same instant and took aim at Reinhold, but the Sergeant got off one well-aimed shot.

The suspect then disappeared from view inside his room. The cops listened for what seemed a long period of time. There was complete silence.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 26, 2019 4:42 am


The Emergency Service Truck manned by Police James Barile and Police Officer Robert Higgins arrived at that moment and threw ballistics helmets and heavy vests down the staircase. As far as they were concerned, Sergeant Reinhold, Officers LaSpina, O"Donnell, and Ahr were still pinned down by the armed male.

With no further shots being fired, and only silence coming from the room, Officers Barile and Luzzi descended the stairs behind a ballistics shield and tied the door down to seal off the room. They placed a ballistics blanket over the door and waited.

Meanwhile, other units had responded to the scene of the firefight. The Sergeant's voice was steady as he transmitted from the basement and ordered the cops to evacuate the homes on either side.

Officers outside spotted "Anthony" through a basement window. He looked like he was unconscious. Emergency Service Sergeant Martin Garvey, of ESS#9 Brooklyn, and Sergeant Reinhold and Officer Higgins opened the cellar door and found that "Anthony" had died with multiple gunshot wounds to the head and body.

When Reinhold had a chance to examine the room, his eyes glanced at the neo-Nazi flag draped on the wall. When they had a chance to search the room, they found seven loaded handguns, twelve rifles of various calibers with seven boxes of ammunition.

There were also two training hand grenades and a homemade explosive device. The also found the presence of cocaine and drug paraphernalia.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Oct 26, 2019 3:10 pm

Here is a great thread from Gabe Suarez forum.

http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.p ... to-succeed

Be sure to read it to the last word. Most excellent.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:50 am

Killer dogs

When I was still living/working/going to school in WV (30 plus years ago) there would occasionally be incidents of hunters being chased/attacked by a pack of dogs. I can remember my dad telling me about it before we'd go hunting. Telling me to be careful and on the look out for it.

One guy climbed a tree and killed two or three dogs with his bow before the rest decided something bad was happening and left so he could climb down and haul ass back to his truck. Oddly enough this seldom happened during small game season. You heard about it more during turkey season and bow season for deer (or pre-season scouting).

When bow hunting one should carry still a handgun.

The woods of the eastern USA these days have everything from feral canines and hogs to bears and lions plus druggies/crazies. There is a post elsewhere of a woman being killed by a pack of smaller dogs.

I have read of police actually shooting a released K-9 dog. The order was given for the LEOs to vacate a building that was being searched and at least one dog was released. It was shot on sight by the LEOs that were still in the building.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:54 am

Bad dogs (or dogs the owners use in bad ways) are BAD JuJu. Overwhelming violence is the only real solution. They are MUCH closer to their instincts and even one can be a handful if you round a corner on it, or it on you. In a group of two or more, shoot fast and keep circling for the one thats trying to take you from behind (there WILL be one)
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Oct 28, 2019 6:47 am

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Oct 29, 2019 2:07 pm

Just to be clear on this: high stress situations have different effects on different people, and different effects on the same person at different times. Don't be surprised if you get through the fight, then find yourself tired, sick or aphasic. This generally has nothing to do with remorse or morality.

It has to do with the chemical changes caused by the massive dump of adrenaline and other self-generated substances that kept you sharp and alive during the fight and are now coursing through your system well after they're needed.

"I'm feeling shaky" is not a mantra. It's likely true, unless you have a 00 number or have been an operator (in which case the long-term effects of stress and adrenaline have to be addressed).
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:32 pm

I have mentioned many times before about the dangers of posting stuff on line to show off how tough you are, how well trained to hurt someone you are, videos of yourself doing 'tough guy' stuff...or some other asinine statements as to why you are better/stronger/smarter...etc. All that becoming a prosecutor's gift.

Here's something from Gabe's forum
From an LE perspective, social media has been a boon for us. Folks will say all kinds of things on forums, facebook, twitter, and a variety of others. and they will say them to almost total strangers (like the male meat eating detective posing as a hot 20 year old tatted chick) .

We can find suspects, motive, associations, and occasionally crimes via these methods (like getting a felon in possession of a firearm through his "posing" pics) .

That's the LE side, now there is the media side, notice how when it fits the narrative the MSM is posting things the suspect said in an event ? While it might not be relevant to the detective, it is VERY relevant to jane soccermom who is selected for your jury (if it goes that far) and she WILL ignore the rule and go searching the news when she is selected for your case.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:33 am

What to say, when to say it, how to say it...after a defensive encounter...weapons or empty hands.

The following is really great knowledge from Gabe Suarez International forum...

All too often as victims of criminal activity being questioned by a law enforcement investigator at the time of the event we feel the need to do the following:

1.Explain everything relating to the criminal activity in great detail
2.Apologize for inconveniencing the investigator
3.Give possible explanations or reasons for the criminal activity
4.Give a detailed account of what we did in response to the criminal activity
5.Give a detailed explanation of why we did what we did in response to the criminal activity
6.Make the law enforcement officer understand our actions
7.Make the law enforcement officer agree with our actions


Those are all nice and important issues to consider; however, they have a time and a place. That time and place may not be with the initial patrol response, and may not be appropriate coming from you...there is a time and place for the attorney.

We need to remember that even though we're dealing with law enforcement our real target audience is the Detective Sergeant, Charging Bureau Chief and Prosecutor.

We need to remember the main issue upon which we are, will be, and should be judged is "reasonableness" and "what would a reasonable person do in this situation" is one of the main filters - if not the main filter - used by the Detective Sergeant, Charging Bureau Chief and Prosecutor when they consider dry-docking your pirate ship.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:38 am

To help us properly take into account our target audience and prepare for the filter they use, it may be helpful to consider applying the "kryptonite to prosecution" immediately and up-front.

Remember, please remember, by and large (exceptions exist of course and they're on my squad) that patrol officer taking the initial report isn't your friend, he doesn't care about your the way you think he does, he wants to go home on time, you're inconveniencing his getting a free soda at the corner store, and you're making him do exactly what he doesn't want to do - type a report.

Also remember, he's allowed to lie to you, most probably will and regardless of what you believe in terms of your voluntariness everything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law.

In an effort to produce "kryptonite to prosecution" and to vehemently exude reasonableness to the Detective Sergeant, Charging Bureau Chief, Prosecutor and Jury you may consider this at the time of initial law enforcement investigative contact (patrol officer and not detective):

1.Micro-statement of criminal event made without analysis based on time to consider

2.Micro-statement of your self-selected assignment as case victim

3.Extremely Miniscule Micro-statement of your activity at event: This should be no longer that what comes out of your mouth having taken one breath of air

4.Statement of what you couldn't do to avoid the situation

5.Statement of what you couldn't do to escape

6.Statement of what you couldn't do to mitigate the threat through non-violent means

7.Statement of what you couldn't do to avoid being placed at a tactical disadvantage that would result in death and/or injury

8.Statement of what you couldn't do to negate the opponent's unreasonableness


This type of conversation is an art. It is an form of art where you want the Detective Sergeant, Charging Bureau Chief, Prosecutor and Jury to believe you had not choice to do what you did, your actions were reasonable when placed in an unreasonable situation and prosecution is forced to consider when all is said and done there would be no reasonable likelihood of conviction were they to bring charges against you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Oct 31, 2019 6:06 pm

If you are ever involved in a defensive encounter, you will have an adrenal dump. Then there will be a 'crash' from the dump.

Here is a great commentary on PTSD by Greg Nichols
Suarez International Staff Instructor (AZ)
In my experience, to mitigate your post event reactions listed above there are a number of things to do, reactions are just that, you are reacting to stimulus, so you need to take action. Action cures everything. With physical/emotional response;

1) Breathe, deliberately control your breathing and get your heart rate down. You will feel more steady and in control if you’re not panting or hyperventilating, this will reducing the shaking and clear your head. The higher your fitness level the easier this is going to be.

2) Think, organize the events in your head. Construct the timeline with your observations and be specific and deliberate. Force your mind to slow down and think.

3) Take a knee, if it’s tactically sound take a knee, focus on relaxing your body. Bodies in motion tend to stay in motion, you don’t want to maintain an excited state any longer than you need too, this prolongs the adrenaline high and makes the crash that much worse, the sooner you can relax the less fatiguing the entire event will be.

4) Drink, if available, something with sugar and caffeine in it is best, this will reduce the crash chemically in your body by slowing the angle of decent and will help take away the shakes/nausea.

I strongly recommend against alcohol as this will make for a faster/steeper crash and reduces your emotional control. Even water is better than nothing, you're going to have a dry mouth so why fight it. Again it's about getting as back to feeling normal as you can as efficiently as you can.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 01, 2019 6:01 am

Were I in a shooting as a civilian, some things I'd want to know might be:

1. Why is a search warrant being conducted even though I gave consent?
2. Why is an Order to Obtain being produced and for what will the DNA be used?
3. Why are they asking me about my social media presence?
4. Why are they speaking to my neighbors about my history in the area and interaction with them?
5. Why did they take my firearm and will I get it back?
6. Am I going to be booked into Jail?
7. Do my ties to the community, home ownership and employment play a role in the decision to book me or not?
8. What constitutes Reasonable Suspicion and Probable Cause?
9. Are my interviews voluntary? Can I leave? Why is the door closed to the interview room? When they say they'd like me to come to the station for an interview, why do they drive me or have me follow them? Is there a difference?
10. Why am I being advised of my Miranda Rights and what do they really mean? What are the consequences for invoking or revoking?
11. Can I change my mind later?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 01, 2019 6:05 am

When I say articulate, you (or your attorney) must be able to paint a picture explaining to the investigator your thought process, rationale, logic, feeling, fear, inability to react differently, etc.. If unable, or unwilling to do this, the investigator and/or jury is left to fill in the blanks - which may be unfavorable.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 01, 2019 6:16 am

Please remember, what you did do is virtually as important as what you could not do! What precluded you from leaving, how it played out, and the exterior forces "forcing your hand" are critical. You must - must - must be able to articulate that. The notion of exterior forces "forcing your reasonable response to an unreasonable situation" is why social media presence is so critical.
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