Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 5:31 am

gary6dan »

Van,

I believe that while many do become angered easily as I have wittnessed in situations, I also know many who are very passive in their ways. Work, friends and relatives who have shown and expressed the "no need" to become upset or angry philosphy that appears to work for them. Possibly they handle stress levels differently and do to a different wiring or learned behavior, react very passive even in confontational situations.

While in a managerial position at work, one must at all times "control" the action and words that are used in customer and employee confrontations.

However, the inner self still "feels" but ignores and controls the situation at hand. The others whom I mention in discussion I have had with them regarding this topic matter, state that they do not get upset or mad as many do in any situations.

Certainly, I am sure that when it may come to family safety or actual serious threat, they may feel differently.

Gary
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 5:41 am

Emotional high-jacking aside_ you really don’t want to risk ending in jail, hospital, morgue, civil court etc. over a guy breaking in line, right?

If you can discipline yourself from ‘blowing it’ _

A way of possibly handling it:

The people behind you most likely want no part of_ after all the punk broke the line in front of you not them, right? So what do you care about them?

Say to the guy: “Ok _ you must have a reason to bust this line, fine with me, but I am short on time, I’ll just step ahead of you, and do it. Then start making small talk about the long damn wait.

You’ll get respect without a fight, punk feels mission accomplished anyway_ and you have landed the problem in the lap of the persons behind you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 5:44 am

But what if you're armed?


But "turn the other cheek"? Not only is it a good idea, it's absolutely mandatory in the legal environment in which we operate.

When you begin to carry a personal defense weapon, you will immediately notice an increased reticence to get involved in the macho matches in which you may have engaged previously.

Generally, you can only use lethal force for self defense or the defense of another in response to an imminent threat of bodily harm, sexual assault or kidnap.

If you initiate a pissing match with someone which escalates into a shooting, your self defense justification is negated. You will go to jail.

Consequently, civility, forbearance, and patience are absolutely mandatory for the armed civilian (and that includes law enforcement personnel).

So "Turn the other cheek," "Blessed are the peacemakers," and "Thou shall not murder" will serve you well.

Avoidance of conflict is always the best policy. This is the paradox of the concealed personal defense weapon: we equip, train and prepare ourselves and then we must make every effort to avoid employing it.

If you think that your gun makes you ten feet tall and enables you to be rude, confrontational, and gives you god-like power over the people around you, think again because you're on your way to jail. You just don't know it yet.

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 5:50 am

real street combat...Peter Consterdine

Some great training action and street beating realities.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqgeTEwwTzE
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:02 am

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:18 am

Another thing is that should one need to do violence on someone who you know, someone who knows where you live, etc--I see all kinds of other problems..
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:22 am

gary6dan »

Van,

Every situation is unique. I do not think that there is any one way to avoid confrontation and handle challenging conflicts. The work environment is especially difficult. As to loose one's career on top of many other problems discussed previously, is certainly a major consideration.

I find that it is more the "street" attitude being carried into a workplace that often is confrontational. The younger ones with the need to prove "reputation" rather than be respectfull to their co-workers.

Then there are those whom we just do not get along with. Bad chemistry, perception, tone of voice etc.

With some of the recent topics disscussed, there is some conflict in between the "avoidance" of physical confrontation via all measures , including backing down, apologizing, etc. even the suggestion of running away. This does appear to be a mind set of "defensive" actions, or non-action.

Whereas we on the other hand, we speak of "offensive" mind set. Ready to go at the drop of a dime. Being aggresive and responsive to the mere possibility or potential of confrontation.

Conflict being, too much attempt to "avoid" through passive measures could leave one as discussed on another thread, "a third of a second to late for reaction " or possibly the opposite being, one takes the high ground upon verbal engagement and seeks to attack aggressively (offensively) to shut down the potential threat.

It is that split second, or that inch of ground, that could strongly influence the outcome of a situation. Certainly, the abilty to read one's body language, keep distance and determine when to engage, is most critical.

Another thing is that should one need to do violence on someone who you know, someone who knows where you live, etc--I see all kinds of other problems..

This is also very true. As in the old days, a fist fight usually ended as that. Now, if someone knows who you are, where you work, or where you live, they very well might seek revenge. Not a good thing to worry about.

You also need a psychological wall to hide behind. Not easy but it helps.

This is also true. As often, in walking away from a situation that we would have perhaps preferred not to have, I often have found myself in search for that "psychological" reasoning to justify having not taken action.

Respectfully,

Gary S.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:42 am

read this about tactical effective movement_



McYoung

Running the table_

Have you ever played pool with a really good pool player? Did you ever get a shot? Against a good player the answer would be "no."

To understand effective movement all you have to do is look at what every shot a good pool player takes creates. Not only will he sink a ball (that gives him another shot), but every time he does that, he sets up his next shot.

The cue ball will roll to a position where his next shot will be simple. That's because what he wants to focus on is the set up of his next shot. If he can't sink a ball, then he positions the cue ball so you don't have a shot. Meeting these standards is how a pool shark "runs the table."

Effective movement allows you to run the table in a physical conflict. Here is a standard of effective offense, every move you do needs to meet three fundamental standards. These are:

1) It secures your perimeter (keeps you covered)
2) Disrupts his ability to attack you (stuns him, unbalances him, changes his orientation, undermines what he needs in order to attack you
3) Sets up your next move

If your moves do not meet these standards, you are not being effective. And by not being effective, you are not removing either his Ability or Will to attack.

For every second that you do not meet these standards, he will be able to attack you.

Consider the implications of these standards. Not only are you not leaving any holes for him to attack you through, but more importantly it puts you a step ahead in the game.

That's because, if you disrupt his ability to attack you his next movement must be to reset in order to continue attacking.

In other words his next movement isn't an attack, it's moving back into position he needs to be in order to attack again. In the mean time, you are set up to do it to him again.

In this manner you create a very specific set of circumstances. That being: It's never his turn. This is how you run the table in a physical conflict

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:44 am

The flow of seven

Envision your study of martial arts as a river flowing along these sevens:

Seven orientations to the self

Seven rights that preoccupy us

Seven demons that plague us

1_ Seven orientations to the self: self preservation - self gratification - self definition - self acceptance - self expression
self reflection - self knowledge.


2_ Seven rights that preoccupy us: the right to be here - the right to feel and want - the right to act - the right to love and
beloved - the right to peak and be heard - the right to see - the right to know.


3_ Seven demons that plague us: fear - guilt - shame - grief - lies - illusion - attachment.

4_ Seven archetypes: exister - creator - maker - lover - speaker - watcher - worshipper. Or, politician - optimist - warrior -
artist - communicator -reflecter - preceptor.

5_ Seven centers: Courage - Creativity - Manifestation - Joy -Truth - Vision - Inspiration.

~~
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Nov 08, 2019 6:47 am

Any confrontation, potentially lethal or otherwise, is a time-based competition for limited resources. Several people are trying to take possession of the same commodity simultaneously.

As with sharks, human predators usually "bump" before they "bite." We need to recognize the "bump" for what it is.

Bad guys will probe first to be sure you are safe for them to attack before committing to a strike.

The last chance for one's deselection strategy to succeed is during the "bump."

Predators can distinguish a deliberative pause from indecisive dithering.

When you make eye contact with them and then go into a deliberate and practiced repertoire, like moving laterally, issuing a verbal address, and simultaneously scanning all around, it always troubles them and forces them to reevaluate.

In most cases, such deliberate action will cause you to fail your audition. On the other hand, prey behavior on the part of the potential victim always elicits predator behavior on the part of the predator.

When a predator abruptly goes from outwardly aggressive to quiet, he is about to explode into his attack.

He is mentally transitioning from domineering behavior (within his own clan) to hunting behavior (outside his clan).

He is deciding that you are not in his clan and that you are therefore fair game. That is the moment when you must get distance and be ready.

We must move when we are evaluating, not just when we're contemplating the use of deadly force. As soon an any species of danger is perceived, we need to start moving.

Most of us now move laterally during the draw, but we must do the same thing when we see a threat and our gun is already out.

Lateral movement upon perceiving a threat legitimately applies in both circumstances.

Verbal addresses and commands must be practiced to the point where they are, in effect, a "tape loop" which can be played on demand. Trying to think of something clever to say on the spur of the moment is usually fruitless.

Often the best way to get distance from a potential attacker is to actually move toward him at an angle and then step (sometimes push) past him.

He expects you to back up. He therefore often chooses a place for attack where retreat to the rear is impossible. Pushing past him usually takes him by surprise and befuddles his attack plan.

Predators who select you for victimization believe you have neither the ability nor the will to shoot them.

If they did, they would pass you by. Therefore, often the best strategy is to let them see what they think they want to see. Lock them into that way of thinking and then surprise them by explosively counterattacking.

ANY tactic will be successful against someone who doesn't want to fight.


/John [Farnam]
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:50 am


Most common mistakes:

1.Fail to disengage and exit when you have the chance.

2.Everyone needs a disengagement and exit strategy, the crux of which is the ability to abruptly break away and create distance when the situation starts going in the toilet.

3.Out of politeness, we often stay involved in personal or phone conversations when danger is present. The effect is to keep us in close proximity to danger.

4.Fail to "stack" threats.

5.We need to train ourselves to always move to a position where we are only confronting one potentially dangerous person at a time. Allowing them to array themselves against us makes it difficult for us to observe all of them simultaneously. It also make it easy for them to "gang up" on us.

6.Fail to scan all around, constantly.

7.Predators will allow you to scan in their direction when they are hidden. Then, they will then approach you quickly from that same direction. Scanning must be frequent and continuous, even when some particular thing has your attention.

8.Forgetting about OC

Many participants forgot that they had OC spray on their person. OC is great for abrupt disengaging, but you have to have it out and use it at the right moment.


9.Fail to unburden hands.

You need your hands to fight! This year, participants in the force-on-force exercises had things in their hands, like groceries, dry cleaning, etc.

Many tried to disengage, exit, and fight as their weak-side hand (in some cases, both hands) were occupied with bulky objects which had little value. We need to free our hands immediately when danger threatens.

10.Telegraphing intent with clenching of fists, trembling, starting a movement then hesitating.

The more unexpected a move, the more likely it is to be successful.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:00 am

For your gun fight fantasy


More mistakes you want to avoid_

a.Firing more than a few shots from one place.

Bad guys quickly figured out where a shooter was and where to hold their sights.

Those who moved around an object of cover and moved from cover to cover rapidly presented the most difficult challenge to bad guys.

b.Shooting and moving simultaneously.

Trying to shoot and move at the same time seldom produces desirable outcomes. What it does do is (1) put bullet holes in everything EXCEPT the bad guys and (2) quickly run one's pistol dry.

c.Fail to look through screens, windows and doors, taking them as barriers.

I failed to see several targets simply because they were beyond a door or window, because my mind had already written off that area.

When there is a conflict between your map and reality, it is your map that is at fault. Reality is always right.

d.Fail to pie corners completely.

Many of us pied corners only half way, only to discover (too late!) that a bad guy was scrunched in a corner.
/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:02 am

More mistakes

e.Gun extended too much and too far forward in close environment.

It is so tempting to extend one's pistol into a normal stance while in a building, but we have to train ourselves to practice the "compressed ready" position any time there is significant danger of a disarm attempt.

F.Fail to shoot at "alternate center of mass" or "center of exposed mass"

Several bad guys were exposed only partially, as they leaned out of windows and doorways. It's always tempting to wait until you can get a round into the center of his chest, but you may never get the chance. We must, without delay, take whatever our best shot is, the instant it becomes available.

g.Fail to "reverse pie"

When someone with a gun is pursuing you through a built-up area, you can "reverse pie" as he tries to pie a corner, looking for you. This tactic often lures him out into the open.

h.Misjudging threats and potential threats

Only twenty-seven percent of murders take place during armed robberies.

The rest take place during confrontations with disgruntled employees and former employees, mentally ill persons, burglary suspects, and current and former wives, suitors, and husbands.

Sometimes, we think that inadvertently walking into an armed robbery is the most likely time we will be confronted with deadly force, but that is not true.

Many other circumstances are just as dangerous and we must think of them as such.

/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:05 am

More sage NTI 11 comments and observations. This from my friend and colleague, Claude Werner

"1) At non-contact distances (=>3 feet), chances of getting a decent hit on a moving human without using the sights is pretty slim. Point shooting is pretty much worthless when shooter or shootee is moving. ‘Body indexing' completely falls apart.

"2) If you have the physical capability and the situation permits, running laterally or obliquely makes you a difficult target even for a good shooter.

3) Target fixation (not checking behind you) is a habit that builds very easily on a flat range and requires a lot of deliberate practice to overcome. I am going to incorporate it into my dryfire routine as another necessary aspect of gun handling.

4) Integrating firearms and vehicles is more difficult than you think.

5) Use OC early and often. I was glad I had it and glad I used it as much as I did."


/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:08 am

>From a friend who is a range officer with a large, metro police department. He is also a seasoned martial artist, one of the best I know:

"It is usually Isosceles shooters who need to ‘prove' the superiority of their method. That kind of intellectual fixation on stance reduces the psychological adaptability of the shooter.

Convulsive tensing of the body tends to induce a similar condition of the mind, with all the characteristic occlusion that follows.

As William James wrote a century ago, ‘We don't so much run away because we are scared, as we are scared because we run away.' Posture influences attitude. A cramped, tensed, and inflexible posture engenders a similar condition in the mind."

Well said!

/John
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