Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 10, 2020 12:17 am

You were also possibly witnessing some very powerful ancestral instincts, TSD.

There are certain other pathological fears, and certain peculiarities in the expression of ordinary fear, which might receive an explanatory light from ancestral conditions, even infra-human ones.

In ordinary fear, one may either run, or remain semi-paralyzed. The latter condition reminds us of the so-called death-shamming instinct shown by many animals.

Dr. Lindsay, in his work 'Mind in Animals,' says this must require great self-command in those that practice it. But it is really no feigning of death at all, and requires no self-command.

It is simply a terror-paralysis which has been so useful as to become hereditary.

The beast of prey does not think the motionless bird, insect, or crustacean dead. He simply fails to notice them at all; because his senses, like ours, are much more strongly excited by a moving object than by a still one.

It is the same instinct which leads a boy playing 'I spy' to hold his very breath when the seeker is near, and which makes the beast of prey himself in many cases motionlessly lie in wait for his victim or silently 'stalk' it, by rapid approaches alternated with periods of immobility.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 10, 2020 12:18 am

all human beings in whom we perceive a certain intent towards us, and a large number of human beings who offend us peremptorily, either by their look, or gait, or by some circumstance in their lives which we dislike.

Inhibited by sympathy, and by reflection calling up impulses of an opposite kind, civilized men lose the habit of acting out their pugnacious instincts in a perfectly natural way, and a passing feeling of anger, with its comparatively feint bodily ex pressions, may be the limit of their physical combativeness.

Such a feeling as this may, however, be aroused by a wide range of objects. Inanimate things, combinations of color and sound, bad bills of fare, may in persons who combine fastidious taste with an irascible :temperament produce real ebullitions of rage.

Though the female sex is often said to have less pugnacity than the male, the difference seems connected more with the extent of the motor consequences of the impulse than with its frequency.

Women take offence and get angry, if anything, more easily than men, but their anger is inhibited by fear and other principles of their nature from expressing itself in blows.

The hunting-:instinct proper seems to be decidedly weaker in them than in men.

The latter instinct is easily restricted by habit to certain objects, which become legitimate 'game,' while other things are spared.

If the hunting-instinct be not exercised at all, it may even entirely die out, and a man may enjoy letting a wild creature live, even though he might easily kill it.

Such a type is now becoming frequent; but there is no doubt that in the eyes of a child of nature such a, personage would seem a sort of moral monster. Fear is a reaction aroused by the same objects that arouse ferocity.

The antagonism of the two is an interesting study in instinctive dynamics. We both fear, and wish to kill, anything that may kill us; and the question which of the two impulses we shall follow is usually decided by some one of those collateral circumstances of the particular case, to be moved by which is the mark of superior mental natures.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 10, 2020 12:22 am

One Alternative, if you screw up the tactical Something that sometimes the practice of martial arts will do to a person with grandiose ideations about their capabilities:


The whistle you hear for an eternal fraction of a second…

A 9 mm hollow point…on the way to your brain.

First a thunder, then the blinding light illuminates the

labyrinth of your thoughts..

Before the “rebirth”…

Before the “impact”…

Before the “last blood” gushes to create patterns…

The mouth of the tiger..

A sea abyss…

That suffocates the heart…shuts down the throat…and

smothers your last scream…

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:26 pm

In Combative Perspective we spoke of Situational Awareness. The topic applies here. Don’t assume anything. Most of all remember where you are and who you are. Realize who is around you. The combination of those three factors can often create a very hazardous situation.

Am I suggesting that you profile those around you? Absolutely yes!! Without getting into specifics, we all know what the bad guys look like, how they act, and how they dress. Profile the hell out of everyone. Anyone who does not profile today is stupid.

He stumbled into an in-progress crime. How many guys have walked right in to a robbery in progress or another type of crime? Hundred of thousands of folks all over the world get in trouble every year for just that reason, walking into a problem.


All of the above situations may possibly be avoided and evaded by being alert, noticing the tell-tale clues that may signal some potential trouble, and when possible, disengaging. But disengaging isn't always possible. We'll talk about that too.

The dynamics of a confrontation that starts out as we described have remained virtually unchanged for decades. Why? Because men have not changed the way they fight against each other.

The fight will be close range. I don’t mean seven yards (the distance where most shooting schools prepare you to fight), but more like seven feet. Often it may begin at arm's range, beginning as a fist fight, or a "mad dogging" session.

There will often be at least two adversaries, sometimes more. The bad guys know here is strength in numbers.

Low light confrontations are very likely. Because we venture out after dark so often in urban areas, and the bad guy seeks its cover, the lighting conditions may be poor. How dark is your house at 3 AM?

There is a good chance that you may be totally unprepared, that is, not expecting a fight. If you have a pistol with you, it will probably be carried concealed, thus the one second draw you routinely do on the shooting range may be a bit slower.


While some of these dynamics can be prepared on a shooting range, or simulated in a shoothouse, the incident itself can only be duplicated safely by using training guns such as Airsoft.

To replicate the dynamics seen in a real event, many of the artificial “range safety” rules that we must observe when training on a shooting range must be set aside.

The basics, such as keeping the finger off the trigger until a conscious decision to shoot has been made, or being certain of your adversary before firing, etc., are easily maintained in combat. Other rules specifically designed to run a safe firing line may seem essential on the range, but are ludicrous in a gunfight.

They are essential on the shooting range because a mistake with a live loaded weapon can have tragic results. On the other hand, in a fight, winning it takes precedence over notions like not covering suspected adversaries with a gun muzzle, not breaking the 180 degree line, etc.

Square range marksmanship training is important to develop necessary skills, to learn how to hit with speed and accuracy, and learning how to run your gun. But training exclusively on the shooting range for the development of marksmanship is not sufficient to prepare you for in-your-face arm’s length combat against a live human being bent on your destruction.

Some trainers and schools realize the deficiencies of exclusive square range marksmanship training and seek to devise ingenious target systems and exhaustive technical drills in the hopes of replicating what the real world will bring. Unfortunately, they fall short in replicating what your actual enemy will do and act like.

I have seen dummies dressed up in clothing, plastic guns taped to their hands and mounted on springs in hopes of simulating movement.

Unfortunately, no inanimate piece of plastic or paper will ever truly replicate a human adversary. No matter how you dress it up, how you position it in a shoot house, what you tape to its hands, or how you make it bob and weave, nothing can truly duplicate a human enemy.

Your real “target” is not an inanimate piece of plastic or cardboard but rather another man like you, who for some reason has selected you as his target. Its about fighting, not just shooting.

Another area where mistakes in training are made is in the design of movers, or moving targets. There are elaborate machines designed to run a target toward you at high speed. The student is told to try and outdraw the rapidly advancing target, but they are not permitted to move. Why not?


Well, because it would cause shots to go into the mover's machinery or otherwise be outside the intended impact area, etc. Range Gizmos like these reinforce incorrect tactics (such as holding your ground under attack instead off moving offline) that could potentially get you killed. Avoid them!

So how do we train realistically enough to be able to fight well in the real world? The answer lies in leaving the square range, leaving the live fire training method, and leaving the actual firearm and moving into the world of interactive training (aka Force on Force). If yu have only done live fire on the range and no force on force, your training is not complete!



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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:40 am

Rest Stops Safety

We may have touched upon this in the past… it remains a serious problem.

A week ago a friend of mine…after pulling in...and closing his eyes to rest…at a stop on Route 84 in Ct…heard some voices ‘lets do him now’

He was barely able to start the car and ‘punch through’ and away in time from three punks trying to surround his car.

It was dark …. And at night the stops can be VERY creepy, more so past midnight_ especially some of the more rural ones.

I have heard that some of the punks hide in the woods and watch for cars pulling in with the right target then move in.

One problem, defense wise, is that you cannot have a gun as you travel interstate.

I try to park on the exit way not far from re-entering the Pike.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:45 am

Another problem is when you are in one of rest area the stalls and realize footsteps approaching stopping just outside, with the rest of the place totally deserted.

One person mentioned that a strategy might be to open a folding knife with a loud click and say 'don't even think about it' _

This reminds me of the way Laird masterfully handled an aggressive panhandler in 'the tunnel' he was crossing once with his wife and kids.

Better have pepper spray in your hands at all times when in one of those places if you must really stop. You might be better off pulling over the side of the hwy and tinkle in the woods.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 5:49 am

Bruise Lee »

About 20 years ago, a friend of my dad was traveling the interstate and stopped at a rest stop. He went in to use the bathroom. 2 guys went in after. He did not come out for a long time. The 2 guys came out.

The guy's wife got worried and went and looked. They had beaten him, and according to what my dad told me, cracked his skull completely around in a circle. He had a lot of neurologic deficit - affluent aphasia was one thing.

This never leaves my mind when I or my family go into a rest stop traveling the interstate. Would never let my family go in without a partner. Always park in a well lit space or space occupied by other vehicles - never in a dark isolated place.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 6:10 am

Target: Walmart

http://www.jrrobertssecurity.com/target-wal-mart-2/

I had read the investigative files, the court transcripts. I had been struck by the arrest photo of the killer. He sneered into the camera, defiant and empty. A portrait of malevolence. How terrible, I thought, that the last images an innocent woman would have on this earth would be of this monster.

The appeals filed on his behalf were typical. He had a bad childhood, he came from difficult circumstances, he abused alcohol and drugs, and he wasn’t responsible. A young legal intern that had worked on one of the obligatory appeals wrote of the convicted killer:

“He sickened me. I mean, here I was trying to keep this guy from being executed, and I found him disgusting. He was a drama queen and a manipulator who thought he was smarter than everyone. He wasn’t.”

I wasn’t surprised when the first thing out of his mouth in my interview with him was an offer to “lead us to the body.” The terrain where he confessed to leaving the corpse of the woman he killed had been searched and re-searched by teams of trained professionals. Corpse sniffing dogs and crews on the ground, helicopters from the air, and dive teams in the surrounding water.

The search lasted months.

Almost three years had passed since an innocent woman was senselessly murdered and the creature who was responsible sat in front of me thinking he would get a field trip.

Over a short period of time he had become a prolific “opportunistic offender” i.e. like most criminals he sought targets that offered a quick and easy take with little risk to him.

“I’d been breaking into cars and stuff since I was about twelve. You just go there (Wal-Mart) and if you park, you can just watch people pull up. Like some people, they will put stuff in the trunk. And if you sit there and watch the people, you know which ones put stuff in their trunk or got stuff in their cars.”

Over a period of a decade, he had frequented Wal-Mart parking lots, stealing purses and packages, developing cons and scams to get cash for “returns” on stolen items, negotiating bad checks and more.

His luck ran out in a Wal-Mart parking lot one afternoon when his wife, tired of being physically and emotionally battered and terrified at the rant he was on in their car, called the police from inside the store and reported him. The police arrested him and found a gun he had been brandishing together with stolen items and forged checks.

In jail, it didn’t take long for him to find a like minded creep. A fellow thief who was easily manipulated and willingly led. He got word that the police intended to file additional charges against him, and two days later, together with his newfound partner, the two of them escaped custody. In the four week, multi-state crime spree that followed, there was a constant thread in all of their activities: Wal-Mart.

Not only did they find a safe haven and targets of opportunity in perpetrating crime at Wal-Mart stores across the country, Wal-Mart even served as a safe refuge for them to spend the night, sleeping undisturbed in their car in the store parking lot.

Just as there was no form of security present or patrolling the lot at these stores, neither was anyone ever assigned to watch the cameras or review the footage. By the time anyone was able to determine that a wife and mother had been seized in broad daylight and driven to her death, days had passed.
After raping and murdering the woman, they continued an erratic cross-country run.

Several days later a 15-year-old girl was confronted by a man holding a gun as she entered her car. What he hadn’t counted on was the girl’s mother, a few feet behind him. His target interrupted, the assailant fled on foot while the quick thinking mother was able to call police who gave chase and ultimately apprehend one of the two fugitives. And where did this take place? A Wal-Mart parking lot.

For me, this sad story was in the words of the immortal Yogi Berra, “Déjà vu all over again.” Just the year before I had been consulted on another case involving the abduction and brutal rape of a young college girl from the parking lot of a Wal-Mart.

Again, no security was present and no one patrolled the parking lot. The young woman displayed enormous courage in fighting back against her attacker, screaming and struggling as she was seized from the Wal-Mart. She survived the attack managing to flee bleeding and naked to a nearby home. Her assailant is still at large.

The Wal-Mart parking lot where the attack took place had been the scene of two violent homicides only a short time before.

So is the fact that Wal-Mart parking lots offer a disproportionate opportunity for criminals come as a surprise to Wal-Mart?

“A quick review of reported cases reveals that Wal-Mart parking lots are a virtual magnet for crime”


Walmart...a damn place to be avoided for a great number of reasons including the jerks who work there.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:29 pm

Multiple opponents

If you ever get into a street fight, chances are you will be up against more than one opponent, possibly armed as well.

Some ideas here:
"Forward Drive Is a "built in" hedge against multiple assailants. You are NOT a sitting duck. By constant aggressive movement, other assailants will be playing "catch up". Always having to adjust and set themselves against an ever moving target."

multiple attackers tend to converge their individual attacks, although there are systems that that really call for coordinated attack. it takes a lot of skill and conditioning to counter the latter.

when you attack one of them, you are moving away from the others and therefore, it's the best bet. you breach their attack ring by disabling one of them. from there, it becomes a footrace. harken back to your school bully days. running away from an entire troop of confused opponents appears easier than from just one determined pursuer.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:22 pm

All I can add is the importance of causing some extreme damage quickly to the first guys on you to start the reconsideration process in the other adversaries. Let them get traction and it will become a big dog pile with you at the bottom.

I've done FOF with the approaches mentioned here of moving to try and deal with one attacker at the time or taking advantage of channelization in the terrain. A small but vicious helping before moving on works well. Anaerobic fitness is really important.


Anaerobic exercise consists of brief intense bursts of physical activity, such as weightlifting and sprints, where oxygen demand surpasses oxygen supply. While aerobic exercise relies on oxygen, anaerobic exercise is fueled by energy stored in your muscles through a process called glycolysis


I think this is more important than we think, when relying on our martial arts for self defense.

Both Aerobics/Anaerobic training is a must in order to deal with the heavy demands placed on your body during multiple opponents attack.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:25 pm

My favorite animal form in the martial arts is the cheetah....

I got stuck on foot with a large group between my vehicle with no option for escape other than getting to my vehicle or carjacking someone. Long story short I made use of foot work, in this case several blocks, eventually leading them in a big half circle and then cutting a corner and sprinting back to my car.

My self learned lesson was thinking beyond the immediate action drill at close quarters and being in sufficient shape to run about 4 blocks at my best sprint to make it out in one piece.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:28 pm

Also, how about creating a DGH (Downed-Guy Hole) in your adversaries? Shoot or slice or punch your way through the one guy between you and possible exits.

This does not have to be the group leader or Chief Tard...in fact we should NOT waste precious time, energy, or thought to figuring out any a$$hole's social positioning.


As my TI in the USAF was fond of screaming, "MAKE A HOLE, MAKE IT LARGE, AND MAKE IT FAST!"

I think this is a viable and much more worthy pursuit as it will hopefully enable you to make an exit with a DG underfoot for any pursuit-minded jerks...make 'em stumble over a seriously wounded or dying friend to get to you as you completely retreat, or turn and shoot or fight over his body.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:59 pm

When it gets down to it, you will not be able to choose the time, but you may be able to take advantage of a small window in that time.

Having lived through a few of these, I think the most important thing is to never allow yourself to be on defense. When the time comes, attack! He may have started it, but you must turn that around.

Be so frigging vicious that he wants no more of it. In that moment, when he thinks twice, overwhelm your opponent.

Don't screw around, be decisive. The stupidest thing I see on TV is folks holding other folks at gun point. If you need to shoot somebody, the first thing they should notice is the impact.

Don't screw around. If you have to hit somebody, do it already! Don't ever threaten....do it if you are going to and leave it alone if you are not.

Remember, everything is a weapon....even stationary objects. I have hit a lot of folks with my fists, but it is better to hit them with something else.

Or hit him up against something else. For example, many times fights start when the first cuff goes on.

Big mistake, now the officer has a handle and if he knows what he is doing, he will use that handle to pound the unfortunate idiot on a car, on a wall, on a light pole or on the ground.

The lesson, if you cannot hit him with something hard, run him into something hard. Use his "handles."

You have to be even more decisive when dealing with multiple opponents. Bottle them up, line them up, use what is around you to keep from being surrounded. But do not be paralyzed by fear, take the fight to them. Be ruthless.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:52 am

One night, probably around 1986 or so, we were working off duty at a Pat Benatar concert at the Summit in Houston.

One of the Harris County deputies got caught in a bathroom and had five guys beating the crap out of him. I heard it and got in there quick.

Being ruthless turned the tide of that fight and we were able to get through it by bending and beating these boys against the bathroom furniture.

Everybody went to either jail or in an ambulance, but we both went home. Even to this day, he gets the biggest grin on his face when I walk through the door.

He thought he was dead, and damn near had resigned himself to his fate, but after I got into the fight, he got real mean in there. After that it really wasn't fair. The two of us outnumbered them and there was no place for them to go.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:01 am

What Should We Expect From People?

Ralph Mroz
First, I guess, is the notion of "expect." In the larger sense, I don't expect anyone to do anything except stay out of my way, good libertarian that I am.

Have a nice life, and all that. But in a narrower sense, if someone professes to be a student of a discipline, it is disappointing when they refuse to face squarely up to the issues involved.

Take the discipline of self-protection, which is what we're talking about here. Most folks seem to go about it all wrong.

Mistakenly, they first study one of its sub-disciplines - martial arts, guns, or what have you. Then they view the real-life problems of self-protection through the lens of their particular sub-discipline.

Martial arts people see self-protection as a series of martial arts problems, largely ignoring for example, the issues of multiple and/or armed assailants.

Gun people see self-protection a set of shooting scenarios, always assuming that they'll be able to get the gun in their hand, and generally ignoring the issues of less-than-lethal force or encounters too close-in to allow access to their gun.

Naturally, this approach is backwards. The logical and tactically sound thing to do is to first analyze a problem, and then choose the tactics you need to solve it. That is, first understand the dynamics of a violent encounter, and then choose the appropriate tactics to master.
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