Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:12 am

Learn From My Mistakes

I started out in the martial arts decades ago, and for years was as guilty of this same backasswards attitude as anyone. I hated guns (no, I'm not joking)-in my mind they were for fat, lazy rednecks without the ambition or self-discipline to sweat in the dojo!

Then one day, about 10 years into the arts, I had an honest conversation with myself:

"Okay, you've got 10 years of training. You get into a fight with someone without much training or experience. What're your odds?"
"Good."

"Right. Now this guy has training and/or experience. What're your odds now?"
"50/50?"
"Close enough.

Now there's two guys, both without training, but mean. Odds?"

"I dunno, probably less than 50/50, in all honesty."
"Right. Now two guys with training."
"My odds ******."

"One guy with a knife?"
"Oh s*hit!"

The conversation went on for a few more steps, but you get the idea. The next week I was looking for a pistol, and after I had acquired basic marksmanship skills, I made the pilgrimage to several national schools.

The lesson here is one of overcoming prejudice and viewing the discipline of self-protection realistically. You need skills, you get 'em. Should be simple.


My opinion on this
"Okay, you've got 10 years of training. You get into a fight with someone without much training or experience. What're your odds?"
"Good."


If this guy without fight training or experience...is a big strong guy who goes to the gym three times a week and does power lifting like 500 lbs deadlifts/squats/and 300 lbs bench press...

What do you think your odds are now? Remember, he can pick you right off the floor and throw you over his pickup truck like a puppet.

I am at the gym every week and see these guys all the times.And if your answer is 'well, you have got to know where to hit them'...I say good luck to you and make sure your life insurance is paid up.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:15 am

Combat is totally unpredictable. We can train really hard, plan as much as we want, carry the very best in equipment and still lose the fight!

Combat is an EXTREME, high-stress, environment.

With this in mind, remember that the ultimate examination you have to pass is going home to your family, unscathed, from a deadly force encounter. You only get one chance to perform. You are on the stage of life …. or death.

Your child’s laughter, the smile on your wife’s face when you walk in the door after a tour, is your reward.

Are you ready for the fight?


And keep remembering that just about any fight with anybody can turn out to be a 'deadly force encounter'
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:16 am

I have seen instructors teach their students to move rapidly to the rear to “create more time and space” to draw their guns. In what world are you living? Do you have eyes in the back of your head?

If you move into unknown terrain (to the rear) inside a home, you are most surely going to land on your back, the WORST place to be! Realistic training should reflect this fact.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:19 am

Your tactics MUST include EFFECTIVE empty hands combative skills.

Hammer fist strikes to the bridge of the nose, to the eye socket or temple, followed up by knee strikes to the groin, bladder, stomach, Solar Plexus are but a few tools.


Open hand strikes to the ear, eye gouges and elbow strikes to the head and jaw of your opponent gives you even more options.

Palm heel strikes to the nose or jaw is also effective if delivered with aggression.

When your life is at stake, you can use a web-hand strike to the “Adam’s apple” area of the throat of your attacker.

WARNING: This is deadly force. Crushing the cartilage in the throat can cause bleeding into the lungs that can lead to drowning. Also, swelling in the throat can cut off breathing. Only use strikes to the throat as a last resort!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:22 am

Why should you be so vulnerable to predators when you are inside your car or truck? Let us consider the situation.

When you drive you should (by law) be wearing your seatbelt, and your doors will be locked against forced entry.

Your view to the rear and sides of the vehicle is limited to that provided by three – possibly two – small mirrors; space inside the vehicle is restricted and there are many items that may impede your escape – the steering wheel, gear shift, passengers, etc.

Add to this the two (or more) people armed with firearms who are intent on killing you and you will see that you are trapped in your car. A motor-vehicle is not as ‘safe’ or as bulletproof as movies would lead you to believe.

Ambush!

Picture the following scenario. You are driving home to the farmhouse after a hard day’s slog in the field. You are desperately tired and your mind is intent on the work that must be completed by the end of the week. It’s time for a hot meal and a cold beer.

As you make the turn onto your familiar dirt road your approach is blocked by another vehicle. There are deep ditches alongside this rather narrow track so there is no possibility of turning the car around to escape. Suddenly somebody starts shooting at you. You are now trapped in a vehicle ambush. The solution?

Drive Through!

My best advice is to attempt to drive through the ambush. But there is a danger that should you ram the vehicle blocking your way you may damage the engine of your car and cause it to stall.

Keep in mind that an increasing number of modern cars are fitted with air bags which deploy automatically in the case of a front-end collision, trapping you even further and blocking your view. If you are able to push your way through, KEEP GOING - DON'T STOP!

Although, as pointed out above, vehicle bodywork is not bulletproof, but your car can take enormous punishment from small arms fire and still remain functional.

On a recent trip to the United States I witnessed a police department demonstrate this to its officers. A vehicle was started up and officers fired at the engine with every pistol, SMG and 223-patrol rifle that they could lay their hands on.

Pieces of the car went flying in all directions, but the engine kept running. Only when a round went through an electrical cord in the engine and the ground around the car was littered with empty magazines, did the engine stall. The officers then shot at the tires, which deflated very slowly. Next, it was the turn of the petrol tank.

All that happened was that the fuel leaked out – no explosions. So much for the hero who stops a car with one shot – and the car then explodes. So you may be able to keep driving, even if your car is hit by incoming rounds. But remember YOU are definitely not bulletproof.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:27 am

Using Your Car as Cover

Let us assume that you were neither able to drive through the ambush nor turn the car around. You must now bail out of that death trap. Remember, you can’t get away; there are people shooting at you and your car has become a lead magnet.

What is cover? We define cover as an object between you and your attackers that will STOP a bullet. As you are aware, only certain parts of your car are capable of doing this. If the car bodywork merely slows down incoming rounds it should be regarded as CONCEALMENT, not cover.

Is your car cover, or simply concealment against an assailant armed with an AK47?

If you are trapped, try to stop the vehicle with the passenger-side fender at an angle towards the attackers.


This will place the engine in direct line of the incoming fire while you make your escape. The engine is one of the few parts of your car that can be regarded as cover in an emergency situation.

Get your head down as low as possible as you get out of your seat belt. The technique that I teach involves bringing both hands into play simultaneously.

Go for the seat belt release with the right, while the left hand slips under the belt itself, scooping it clear and away from you. Now both hands go for the door – the right to the door-opening lever, the left to the door lock. Push the door open as you roll your body out of the vehicle. KEEP LOW!

Use your hands to break your fall and crawl clear, moving rapidly to the rear of the vehicle. We go to the rear because the open door will obstruct forward movement. Follow the contours of the car.

Once behind relative safety, stay low and draw your pistol from its holster. Breathe deeply. Calm down as much as possible. Time to fight back!

Pop up unexpectedly, identify your target – and shoot. When you come up remember the rule “muzzle first to danger”. If you bring up your head without your gun you will lose precious time.

After firing your first shots get back behind cover. Next, MOVE TO A NEW POSITION. If you keep popping up at the same position it won’t take your ambushers long to figure out where to aim as you emerge.

Move forward and use the engine as cover. Stay low as you move. All that your attacker must see of you is an eyeball and the muzzle of your gun. If they want to advance on you let them do it through a hail of lead. But don’t fire blindly; make your shots count.

If the attack comes from the drive’s side, the procedure remains the same, but you will be forced to crawl over the passenger seat, open the far door to slide out of the vehicle. Remember to keep your head and upper body low as possible as you move.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:29 am

When using your car as "cover" keep at least an arm’s length away from it. DO NOT GET "SUCKED" INTO COVER! If you are too close, you won’t be able to swing the weapon rapidly from left to right or vice versa as required.

Your movement will be restricted and you stand the risk of hitting the car – or whatever cover you choose – with arms, hands or gun. Note that, if you are too close to cover, incoming rounds could ricochet from the car into your body or head.

Keep low as you return fire. Avoid shooting through the closed windows of your car if possible, as you may end up with glass splinters in your face or, more importantly, your eyes.

To reload or clear a stoppage, GET DOWN BEHIND COVER. Don’t stand in the open where you could easily get shot. Always look for better cover. Your car makes a big target that is easy to hit, and yet you are using it as "cover".

Move to better cover as soon as possible. And keep your finger off the trigger until you have acquired a target and have made the decision to shoot. This is a high stress situation.

If you leave your finger on the trigger you may have a negligent discharge, possibly injuring yourself.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:33 am

Guns Inside the Vehicle

This is a contentious subject. Where do I place my firearm inside my car? Picture our scenario again. Suppose your gun was not in its holster but under your thigh on the seat.

Would you have been able to release the seat belt, open the locked car door and retrieve your gun as you bailed out with people shooting at you?

I teach my students to keep their guns in their holsters. When the weapon is in the holster we know that it is secure, can be brought into action relatively fast, and is one less thing to worry about as we make our escape.

Cross-draw and shoulder holsters work quite well inside a vehicle, as you can reach your gun with either hand.

I use the hip holsters for my handguns, even in cars. Remember to pull your concealment garment clear of the safety belt at the beginning of the journey so that your gun is concealed but in easy reach.

As you may have gathered, I am a proponent of the ‘ESCAPE FIRST, FIGHT LATER’ school of thought.

Do not place your gun on your lap or the passenger seat while driving. If you have to ram your way through an ambush – or if you in turn are rammed – your gun is sure to go flying under the pedals or the seat.

As you try to escape you will not be able to retrieve it quickly enough – or you might not find it at all. And choose a good, sturdy holster.

If you carry your gun in a flimsy, cheap piece of garbage you can expect to lose the gun during your exit. Not a good thing to happen when somebody is trying to kill you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:50 pm

Handy items for your car
What I recommend are commonsense items. Although I hated the cell phone when it first reached this country, it has since become a must in our defensive toolbox.

Help is only a phone call away if you are attacked, if your vehicle breaks down or you are involved in an accident, etc.

I also recommend a strong flashlight, a first aid kit, and a large folding knife.

I suggest a one-hand opening model, such as the Emerson Commander model, as you may have only one hand available.

The knife can be used for cutting through a seat belt in an emergency and could even serve as a defensive weapon. One item that you should NOT be without is an Israeli Battle Dressing(IBD). These compression bandages are life-savers.

Points to Remember

It CAN happen to you.

When using your car as "cover", neither you nor the car is bulletproof. Use the tires, rims and engine as emergency "cover" if no other is available.


Beware of muzzle masking when shooting from cover. ‘Masking’ means that as you look through the sights you appear to have a clear shot but, as the muzzle is lower than the sights this may not be so and you could hit part of your cover (in this case your car).

Whenever possible, place the engine of your vehicle between you and your attackers; this should stop incoming fire.

Move from your covered position only if forced to, or to find a superior position during a lull in the action.

Let your adversaries come to you – don’t go ‘hunting’.

Remember the “three eye” principle. As you reach cover, draw your gun and prepare to fight back, first bringing up the gun – THEN your head.

If you look first without the gun you will waste valuable time getting the weapon on target. You have two eyes in your head – the muzzle of the gun should be your third ‘eye’.

Remember; muzzle first to danger at all times.

Stay as calm as you possible can. BREATHE, BREATHE, BREATHE! If you panic you will be unable to think clearly.

Your brain is your most important weapon.
You are either a survivor or a victim. Make your choice NOW!

REMEMBER: YOU CAN SHOOT FROM AND BE SHOT FROM UNDERNEATH YOUR VEHICLE! JUST BECAUSE YOU'RE BEHIND A PIECE OF "PLATE AND PLASTIC" DOES NOT MEAN YOU ARE BEHIND COVER!
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:09 pm

jthulse »

This is a daunting post Van. The most important message I see from this is in the last post, IT CAN HAPPEN TO YOU!!! This is the human failing in one sense. So many people live dangerously unaware of their environment.

We have to think that it will not happen to us or we would never go out of the house and that would be barracked as well. However, we must be aware of our vulnerabilities and take the steps that have been mentioned above.

I agree with you about the mobile phones as well. It is a good just in case tool.

Some targets have been mentioned above and there are many of them but don't just think about hitting them once or only one target. Continue until you can escape the situation. How to combat the odds?

Every confrontation you have consider that the person or people that you are confronted with are good martial artist, are the best street fighters you could meet and always carry a weapon. What's your defensive choice with that in mind?
Jim Hulse
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Kyusho Do
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:14 pm

Thank you Jim, excellent comments.

The thread was sparked by a new friend I made, a State Trooper, who has become my next door neighbor.

He talks of his police experiences and training with me a lot and enjoys my forum.

We also do much shooting at the range together.

The thrust of his position on all the talk about self defense he sees discussed is that…if we don’t train physically and mentally to deal with deadly situations where one or more assailants are intent on killing you, then you are not really training but just working out.

At the Police Academy where he trained_ this concept is emphasized up front for police and civilians as well.

Their theory is that anyone willing to get into a real fight today, has the underlying intent to hurt you badly or kill you regardless of what he says or does that might appear ‘different’ _

As you say…if we are not prepared to assume the worst in any confrontation then we are just kidding ourselves.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:16 pm

tigereye »

Van,
I agree with your friend! No one can deal with a deadly situations without train physically and mentally.

Do you know why people fail to understand your teaching?
Because they are so fascinated by the color of the belt!
Race for the black belt! This is the only thing why many people find karate important.
The magic power of the black belt...!
I was wondering: Do they really believe that the color of the belt will make them immortal!?
There is lots of work to do to change the way of thinking!
Eva
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:20 pm

We asked Cooley Law School's Jim Peden what kind of questions that a prosecutor needs to be asking.

"If someone's claiming self-defense, you've got to look and see if they're the aggressor, and the amount of force they used, and was the amount of force they used necessary?" Peden said.

Under state law, self-defense applies only when the person claiming self-defense meets a two-part standard for perceiving the threat of great bodily harm or death.

"The person who's being threatened is asked, 'Did you feel threatened with great bodily harm?' And they say, 'Oh yeah, I did.' And the second question, the second shoe to drop is, was that fear reasonable?" Peden explained.

By that standard, self-defense is a concept that is both subjective and objective.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:23 pm

jthulse »

Hello Van

I heard a story yesterday that shows exactly what we are talking about with awareness.

A lady was at the petrol station in a town near to me a couple of days ago. It was in the evening, dark. She filled the tank and then went to pay.

She didn't lock her doors when she went to pay.

As she was paying the cashier said to her,
"Don't look around and come inside. I have already pressed the panic button" She did as she was told. While she was paying the cashier saw a man sneak into her car and lie down on the back seat. The police arrived and arrested the man who was carrying a carving knife!

It'll never happen to me!!!! Think again.
Jim Hulse
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Kyusho Do
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Jan 14, 2020 3:25 pm

Fueling at night at small stations is a risk for all, especially for women as you know.

What is recommended, for a number of reasons, is to fill up when you have ½ a tank of gas…that way you have plenty of time to pick the right place and the right time of the day.

If night is approaching and a long trip is ahead…best to ‘top off’ during daylight hours every chance we get.

As you point out, best to develop a habit to always remove the keys and lock the car every time you exit, even for gassing up.
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