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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 11:11 pm 
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The Author, Fred Leland, is an acquaintance of mine from Walpole PD. I have become fond of reviewing the articles on his "Law Enforcement & Security Consulting "
http://www.lesc.net page both on the net & on his Linked In groups:

http://www.linkedin.com/groups?about=&gid=2762270&trk=anet_ug_grppro

The true life scenario of the murder of a young police officer is critical to this report and the understanding that one has to choose to react, rather than allowing the bad guy to control your actions. In this case, it caused the death of a young officer, whose wife either was pregnant or had just given birth to a baby boy.

The young officers name was Deputy Kyle Dinkheller which made me look up his video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GX5kwVc9IOk

In a nutshell, Fred offers this abridged version of the shooting below, but the pdf cited below makes for a powerful read:

Fred Leland •
Quote:
Jim i have used this video in training for over ten years now and i have never seen one so powerful, with numerous lessons we can all learn from. Why was the officer indecisive? Unfortunately, we will never know for sure what the young officer was thinking. Various responses from veteran officers involved in trying circumstances such as this have said the following regarding indecisive behavior: poor training, liability
concerns, no leadership backing, no community backing, never thought it would happen to him (complacency), reluctance in taking a human life, being disciplined for using force etc.The dash cam video always comes up as one of the many reasons why he may have been slow to ACT!

In the end 60 rounds exchanged—33 by the subject and 27 by the officer; the subject hit the officer a total of ten times, and the officer struck the subject once. The young officer involved died at the scene.The subject escaped and was apprehended the next day.

This incident was a catalyst for personal research on decision making.The unfortunate events that unfolded in the Kyle Dinkheller incident were about decision making, or lack thereof, despite all the physical aspects involved in the conflict. At the core of this tragic incident was a failure to make decisions and seize the initiative. I get into this case much deeper in Critical Decision Making Under Pressure an article i wrote.
http://www.lesc.net/system/files/0043-0074%5B1%5D.pdf


Brian McKenna has written the best piece on what happened in this Kyle Dinkheller case and I have ever read. Its in his great book Officer Down Lessons from the Street. http://winningedgetraining.com/odnowavail.html The book also has about 20 other cases he evaluates, like no one else i have ever read."


Hey its New Years, I am sending this out to my LE friends and my MA friends. Why if you are going to teach MA, you need to understand FEAR and making crisis decisions instantly. Any questions, please let me know.


It's a New Year, "Let's be Careful Out There"! as Sgt Phil Esterhaus used to say on "Hill Street Blues" http://youtu.be/T2QApwtE8zQ

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Jim Prouty
New England Budo Center


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 4:14 pm 
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Happy New Year, my good friend!
Kuma-de wrote:

if you are going to teach MA, you need to understand FEAR and making crisis decisions instantly.

Amen.

I want to go on record as saying we must be very careful not to base policy and process on anecdote. Life happens. And some people will just screw up, no matter how much good training they've had. At the end of the day, we're working with percentages, and the worst situations that man could dream up.

That said, your points are well taken.

This has been discussed at length by many experts in the field. Due to the complex nature of it all, we can never really know why one situation failed. We can be Monday morning quarterbacks and presume to talk with authority, but then we weren't there.

It could be something stupid-simple like not having his home life in order. Yes, that IS a big deal.

I think Van understands what I mean when I say it would take too long to outline "it all" in a brief post or two. But if there can be meaning to a death, then it should be the opportunity to reflect and judge our own preparation for the unthinkable.

The more I learn and the more I know, the more humbled I am. And oddly enough, the less worried I get. Again... life happens. With that, I leave you with a quote from one of my own personal heroes.

I'm a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. *

May Officer Dinkheller rest in peace.

- Bill

* Thomas Jefferson


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 Post subject: Good points bill
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:33 am 
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Pretty sad to look at and to even listen to the strained voice of the police officer under the extreme effect of the chemical cocktail. I guess it is true, after all, that under the cocktail's grip…rational thinking goes out the window.

We all might think we'd have done better…but we weren't there.

But there is a good lesson here for police training as well as martial arts training.

Officer Leland writes
Quote:
Why was the officer indecisive? Unfortunately, we will never know for sure what the young officer was thinking.

Various responses from veteran officers involved in trying circumstances such as this have said the following regarding indecisive behavior: poor training, liability concerns, no leadership backing, no community backing, never thought it would happen to him (complacency), reluctance in taking a human life, being disciplined for using force etc.


This incident was a catalyst for personal research on decision making. The unfortunate events that unfolded in the Kyle Dinkheller incident were about decision making, or lack thereof, despite all the physical aspects involved in the conflict. At the core of this tragic incident was a failure to make decisions and seize the initiative.


Would we, martial artists really fare any better in situations where we would be attacked empty handed or with weapons?

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:03 am 
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Officer Leland
Quote:
In his research of cognitive development, Dr. Gary Klein
talks about making decisions under pressure, in what he describes as
recognition-primed decision making.

Klein says that the Recognition-Primed Decision Making Model fuses
two processes: the way decision makers’ size up the situation to recognize
which course of action makes sense, and the way they evaluate
the course of action by imagining it.2 It is important to keep in mind
that decisions evolve with circumstances. While some decisions are
made simply, with more time to decide, other decisions require quick
if-then thinking in order to achieve results. The focus here is how to
prepare the law enforcement and security professions to make those
rapid decisions that need to be made under pressure.


I’d like to know what kind of 'special training' any of us has received from any Uechi sensei here or overseas that would qualify as per the above by Officer Leland.

If we ask , we will hear the 'Mushin' word possibly along with the 'you wouldn't understand' ….LOL
Quote:
… or, an
individual offi cer, who is locked into a complacent mindset, is caught
unprepared and therefore misses critical information that has been unfolding
progressively. In both cases, decision making is diffi cult due to
the lack-of information that is being picked up on, as well as the lack-of
time that is available to process that information.

Critical decision
makers involved in law enforcement and security should aim to
achieve the following goals: to combine the ability to develop the cognitive
decision making process with the physical skills required in both
progressive and spontaneous circumstances, and to refine the necessary
methods through experience, applying methods accordingly—
based on both the environment and current circumstances.

The first
step to achieving these goals is a shift of mind. Intuition is defi ned as
“the way we translate our experience into action.” Our experiences allow
us recognize what is going on (making judgments) and how to
react (making decisions).

Our experiences enable us to recognize what
to do and we can make decisions rapidly and without conscious awareness
or effort. We do not have to think through situations in order to
make a good decision.5

To elaborate, intuition is not magic, not some
strange force that comes from some unknown mystical location; but
rather, intuition comes from refined senses that, in turn, lead to rapid
decision making cycles. These rapid decision making cycles are developed
through tough and continuous development in decision making
exercises.


Is this something we should expect 'naturally' from a few days per week of kata/kumite/conditioning etc.?

I guess this being one of the reasons Rory writes to not trust or rely on 'Mushin' _ What are the components of that mushin that will be 'floating' to the primal brain? How did they get there?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:11 am 
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Leland
Quote:
Recognition-primed decision making is guided and controlled
through tactical judgments based on individual perceptions as circumstances
unfold. Recognition-primed decision making can be enhanced
Through training, and by achieving an understanding that conflict is
Time competitive—requiring us to use observation, orientation, and
Our decision and action cycles quickly yet effectively. This kind of
Training is what COL John Boyd called; “Implicit guidance and control.”
In his work, the late Colonel John Boyd concluded that conflict
Is time competitive observation, orientation, and decision and action
Cycles. Boyd’s decision making cycle has been proven in its ability
to give the upper hand, the clear advantage, to the person with the
Fastest O-O-D-A cycle.

There is a balance between explicit and implicit
Information—law enforcement officers do their homework and gather
information in accordance with what is unfolding at the time.

This
is both an art and science developed by education, training and experience,
and it alludes to the critical importance of understanding
Conflict and the strategy and tactics essential in resolving conflict
.

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 Post subject: Leland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:16 am 
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Quote:
Proper conditioning accounts
for a clearly different process; this kind of training causes our
physiology to shift from a frontal lobe, conscious thinking, analytical
being, and allows for a mid-brain, subconscious, instinctive reaction—
responding through operant conditioning to meet the challenge or
threat.

The words intuition and implicit almost imply there is
something missing. This term implies an unscientific or haphazard approach.

In conflict, one plus one does not equal two, but we live in a
world where there is an explicit answer to every situation—yet in the
real world of conflict that is not the case.

You put two people together
who disagree and you cannot predict what’s going to happen, let alone
the chance of conflicting individuals getting so angry that they decide
to get physical, or worse, deadly.

In conflict there are often factors such
as chaos, uncertainty, disorder, and friction that confuse and slow
down the decision making cycle

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 Post subject: Leland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:20 am 
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Quote:
You cannot predict exactly what’s
going to happen next, because there are things going on that you cannot
see or hear.

For example: the numerous thoughts going through an
adversaries mind: “I will do what I am asked,” “I will not do what I am
asked,” “I will escape,” “I will fight,” “I will assault,” “I will kill,” “I will
play dumb until...,” “I will stab,” “I will shoot,” “he looks prepared I will
comply,” “he looks complacent I will not comply,” etc.

It is important to
remember that the adversary has his own objectives; also, they have
plans as does the other side of the conflict, therein creating further
conflict.

In conflict, 1+1=? If one side pauses to try and fi gure out
(analysis) what’s happening or gather more explicit (precise) information,
it could be over with unfavorable results.

Therefore, the obvious
need for conditioning for tactical judgment or implicit guidance and
control is absolutely necessary
.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:36 am 
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Quote:
Proper conditioning accounts
for a clearly different process; this kind of training causes our
physiology to shift from a frontal lobe, conscious thinking, analytical
being, and allows for a mid-brain, subconscious, instinctive reaction—
responding through operant conditioning to meet the challenge or
threat.

The words intuition and implicit almost imply there is
something missing. This term implies an unscientific or haphazard approach.


In conflict, one plus one does not equal two, but we live in a
world where there is an explicit answer to every situation—yet in the
real world of conflict that is not the case.

You put two people together
who disagree and you cannot predict what’s going to happen, let alone
the chance of conflicting individuals getting so angry that they decide
to get physical, or worse, deadly.

In conflict there are often factors such
as chaos, uncertainty, disorder, and friction that confuse and slow
down the decision making cycle.

These intuitive decisions are
made rapidly, based on implicit (understood) information or tactical
judgments.

These decisions are made by using the patterns learned
from experience (birth-present), along with the new information being
gathered, as well as analyzing and synthesizing in the rapidly
changing circumstances.

This leads to a second type of decision
making
model—a naturalistic or heuristic model. As presented by
Vandergriff:

“Experience has much to do with this method of decision-making.
There are three key steps inherent in heuristic decision-making:
experience the situation in a changing context, recognize the
pattern of the problem from personal knowledge and experience,
and implement a solution.

Although this is commonly used decision-
making approach, heuristic and naturalistic models for
decision-making have only recently come into prominence in
decision-making literature.7”


This may bring out the usual questions:

Do we need any of this? We are not law enforcement/security officers...we study the 'art' of Karate do...and the moves within this art can be used for self defense when and if a situation arises...

But then, even if we admit that we need 'some of it' _

who's to say how much of it...and how to get it?

Is this really necessary? After all...we never get into fights...that's the last thing on our mind :wink:

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 Post subject: LELAND
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:46 am 
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Quote:
A high stress situation causes chemical changes in the brain that cause one to think
and act differently than when under normal conditions.

Most of those
involved in traumatic situations give little or no thought to their behavior;
they instinctively do what their experience has programmed
them to do, through education, training and preparation.

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Van


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 Post subject: Leland
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:48 am 
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Quote:
When the survival stress response instinctively kicked in, this failure
to adapt caused a form of paralysis. One might ask: “if it’s instinctive,
why did he not do something?”

The answer is that the offi cer did
not act quickly enough because he was not trained properly in rapid
decision making.

In this case, the offi cer’s indecisiveness should not
be attributed to complacency, because he initially appeared alert
and aware—ordering hands out of pockets, etc., in an attempt to gain
some semblance of control.


Once the circumstances went outside
the normal training of what the offi cer had received, the offi cer was
unable to be decisive.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:55 am 
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Quote:
As Boyd has stated, the
perceptions and orientations that people have are based on past experience,
genetic heritage, cultural traditions, and unfolding circumstances
(Boyd, December 1986). In other words, people see things
based on the way they view the world.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 5:56 am 
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Quote:
Can it then, in turn, be expected
that the citizens outside of the law enforcement and security
professions base their perceptions, and make their judgments, as a result
of the communications on behalf of the abstract world of the media—
such as news, movies, television and print—in which they are
engulfed regularly?

If judgments are made as such—based on something
that the general public has heard, something that has never been
disproved, something that they have never experienced, etc.—how
can the general public begin to understand the real reasons behind
these decisions, in such a way that the silent evidence (thought process,
decision making, survival stress, etc.) is considered in the process?


Again, the process should be training, training and being more open
and honest as to what the law enforcement and security professionals
do and why they do it.

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 Post subject: Ignorance is no excuse
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 11:30 am 
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Considering how much of our world is in combative situations at any given moment be it war, peacekeeping or crime control... we as a so called civilized society are for the most part lacking a great deal of knowledge about the warriors we employ to do our bidding. Education in the schools is in my opinion the most important step. The material available now from research and publications by Crossman, Christensen, Gaven de Becker etc...would not only stimulate minds to dig deeper and expand our knowledge why and how our warriors react (giving them a gun to protect our interest makes them warriors) but will also give them (future generation) a better understanding of themselves.
Without knowledge the media will (and has) guide our thinking with magic even Merlin would be envious of
:lol:

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:42 pm 
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Quote:
The material available now from research and publications by Crossman, Christensen, Gaven de Becker etc...would not only stimulate minds to dig deeper and expand our knowledge why and how our warriors react (giving them a gun to protect our interest makes them warriors) but will also give them (future generation) a better understanding of themselves.


Good points Leo.

And this applies in spades to martial arts practitioners as well.

As Rory points out in his book_ we_TMA- students_ feed on assumptions for the most part…when the defensive component of our particular system is suddenly called upon to function under a bewildering array of variables we have had no exposure to_ and even worse_ that we refuse to believe will make any difference in our 'defensive' situation.

After all, we have our 'big three' and 'Mushin' don't we?

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 Post subject: The big three
PostPosted: Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:18 pm 
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Not what you are thinking.

Section 6.5 of Rory's book has an outline on the big three:

1. Awareness
2. Initiative
3. Permission

~~
I think most of us only know the word awareness in general terms, trained as we are to think or see things certain ways only.

Now take a look at how Rory describes awareness in multifaceted dimensions:

A] Awareness of the opponent's body

b] Awareness of the situation

c] Awareness of the dynamic

d] Awareness of your duty, your beliefs, and your place in the universe.

He talks about the 'dedication' of dealing the situation 'as is'
And not responding to imagined fears or wishful thinking.

He outlines ability vs. capacity …of being aware of your real capacities…not the assumed ones.

Rory states that, in his continuing research, he is just beginning to understand much of what goes on in conflict is subject to a plethora of subconscious rules and unspoken contracts...and these affecting the amount of power that can be delivered, damage withstood, and time.

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