Good talk on blocks

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 01, 2020 4:48 am

This from the 'bulletmen' 'Fast defense' is right to the point.

The F.A.S.T. course certainly includes pre-emptives, as I'm sure all properly designed adrenal stress courses will.

However there are two things to bear in mind.

Firstly, training on the bag or pads in pre-emptives is an excellent start.

However, in our scenarios the attacker will be mobile. They will walk up and down. They may rush in and grab you after using some distracting dialogue.

The students on a F.A.S.T. course will always try to hit pre-emptively but sometimes it goes wrong (just like real life in fact).

The student has to play out the scenario as it unfolds.

We often liken it to training protection dogs. You have to build their exposure and tolerance bit by bit.

If a trainer just started hitting them with sticks, all you would get is dogs that are afraid of sticks.


Some of the scenarios used on F.A.S.T. courses, especially the more advanced ones, place the student in really bad starting positions.

You could find yourself starting a scenario face down on the floor or standing with your back to the attacker.

This is to simulate ambush attacks or to put the student in positions where they have to fight really hard to get back onto their feet.

Again, this is the reality of life. There are no rules to attacks and encounters. They all play out differently and you must be prepared to improvise and adapt.


Read this a few times and think of tactical ways out of it.

Keep in mind the case I had where the champion black belt was killed by the gangbanger in the stairway.

In any fight, under the adrenal rush, you will be experiencing serious 'tunnel vision' that no 'sanchin vision expansion' will abate. All lethal force trainers teach to force yourself to look around in training and in fighting to help break the 'tunneling' which is hard wired.

You will be almost completely out of breath and feeling like about to collapse...remember the adrenal rush will be all knew to you.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:29 pm

On F.A.S.T. courses we initially try to ensure that people stick to the simple techniques that we teach such as eye strikes, palm strikes and knee strikes.

This is because these techniques can be taught as gross motor movements and they can be taught with big motion to avoid ineffectual flailing with no power.

Many people faced with a real situation rush to get the striking tool to the target and forget that they need to get body-weight and power in too.


Even trained people will have a tendency to flail from the adrenaline kick, much of the natural increased strenght that adrenaline brings gets dissipated quickly thru the flail...and so many of us 'trained' people will deny that possibility, yet we have no street fighting experience.

I have investigated a great number of 'self defense fights' by trained people, and most of them report some serious problems in delivering effective strikes under the stress of the adrenaline.

And again it all depends on who your opponent is at the moment you 'raise your hands' in a fight. The bigger/stronger...will cause the freeze factor in many ways
you will not even be aware of. Read Rory Millers books.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:30 pm

Rory Miller
Three Stages: Being on the receiving end of an unexpected attack you will go through three stages.

The OC stage. This is where you get hit. If you have trained by operant conditioning (OC) a response to a sudden attack, you may be okay.

Then you freeze. Almost everyone freezes, even experienced fighters. Some break out of it fast. Some don’t and it tends to end very badly.

3. The fight. If you made it through the other two, most of what you have trained will now start to work.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:33 pm

Rory Miller
FFFPS Classic Behavioral Biology lists three survival responses to extreme stress, the ‘three Fs’ Fight, Flight and Freeze.

Dave Grossman lists four: Fight, Flight, Posture and Submit. All five of the listed responses are hard-wired reactions to an immediate serious threat (note- a living threat. The responses to major disasters are quite different, more limited and predictable see “The Unthinkable” by Amanda Ripley).

All are important to this discussion.

Fight-Fight-Freeze-Posture-Submit.

The first two are self-explanatory. Freezing will be the subject of this entire paper. Posturing and submitting need some exploration. First we have to distinguish between FFFPS as hard-wired responses and as strategies.

These responses have evolved and are hard-wired because they work. Things that work can be used as strategies. In the hard-wired version of these responses Posturing and Submitting will only be used within the species.

Submitting to a lion gets you eaten. However, both can make conscious strategies- looking large and being loud will tend to scare off predators; I can’t count the number of times I have befriended a ‘dangerous’ dog by showing puppy/playful body language.

However, I cannot think of a single case when either of these strategies happened involuntarily cross species, only as a conscious decision.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:38 pm

Rory Miller
Is Your Self-Defense Training Based in Reality?

Rory Miller explains seven elements that must be addressed to adapt your self-defense training for the most common types of street violence. Any training that dismisses any of these areas leaves you vulnerable to a potentially deadly violent assault and you might be training yourself to go to jail.

1. Legal and ethical implications. Every martial artist must learn force law, and explore his or her own ethical limitations. Mr. Miller explores this issue so you may determine where this often-overlooked ethical line lies within yourself.

2. Violence dynamics. Unfortunately, many martial arts and self-defense classes do not train for reality-based violence, focused upon how attacks most-commonly happen. Mr. Miller teaches you to recognize an attack before it happens and know what kind of attack you are facing.

3. Avoidance. You will learn and practice escape and evasion, verbal de-escalation, and avoidance of dangerous situations.

4. Counter-ambush. In the unfortunate event that you are attacked unexpectedly, you will need a handful of actions trained to reflex level for a sudden violent attack.

5. Breaking the freeze. Freezing is almost universal in a sudden attack, even for experienced law personnel and expert martial artists. Students must learn to recognize a freeze and break out of one in order to react to an attack quickly.

6. The fight itself. Mr. Miller explains that your training needs to be in line with how violence really happens in the world.

7. The aftermath. There are potential legal, psychological, and medical effects of engaging in violence, no matter how justified.

Any teacher or student of self-defense, and any person who desires a deeper understanding of violence needs to understand the concepts taught in this program.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:39 pm

We've occasionally seen really good techniques thrown instinctively by someone who has obviously trained them over thousands of repetitions.

However, once the pressure in the scenarios is increased such as multiple attackers on the ground, it soon gets back to basic techniques that look really scrappy.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:43 pm

You will tire very easily and be out of breath almost immediately in a fight,

I hit his him with elbows, then more knees to his groin…he finally drops to the ground, as he attempts to stand up, I quickly knee his head and drop him for good. The crowd shouts,

“Look around,” a part of the training to help break the tunnel vision effect of the adrenal rush. I quickly turn to see if there’s anyone else, there isn’t.

I walk off the mat completely out of breath and feel like I’m about to collapse; the whole engagement lasted less than 60 seconds, but felt like 5 minutes.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:45 pm

Most martial artists still think they own the Holy Grail, and that’s unfortunate.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 9:46 pm

When someone perceives a life-threatening situation, epinephrine is automatically released into the bloodstream (for more energy) and alters our body’s system.

Our bronchial passages dilate (pumping in more oxygen) our heart rate increases (giving us more endurance), our pupils dilate (helping fine focus, but causing tunnel vision) auditory exclusion and Tachy-psychia occurs (the misperception of the passage of time).

Without proper training some of these effects can be disabling.

Tachi-psychia can cause a person to freeze; the results of visual and auditory exclusion are obvious, loss of fine motor control will leave you without fancy defensive moves, and an increased heart rate may cause you to panic even more.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 10:22 pm

Control is essential for our ability to react and assess potentially dangerous situations. With control, we have access to two very important ingredients: the ability to Adapt and Improvise.

No matter how much a martial artist trains in a dojo with techniques, those techniques stand a good chance of being useless if you can’t adapt them to fit the situation.

You have a great advantage if you’re able to improvise (under stress) with objects near you, or your environment.

Instead of training in dozens of techniques, it’s better to master only a few.

Techniques that use gross motor skills are best, these include knee strikes, low kicks, palm heel and slaps, and eye strikes among others.

Don’t worry about your strength, that will come from your adrenaline state. In the end, it’s your mental ability that wins the fight, and that’s what this type of training cultivates, your mental attitude.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 10:26 pm

Striking first

Most encounters always start with a verbal component, which is essential, since most fights can still be diffused at this stage, and, this also sets up your legal defense, if needed.

If the de-escalation doesn’t work, then a first strike is recommended.

This comes hard for some students but you have to remember, if a predator has crossed your verbal and physical boundaries, he’s really coming to do you harm.

A first strike puts you in charge of the situation; it’s always harder to react than to initiate action.

If your aggressor realizes that you’re not going to be a victim chances are that he’ll get out of there fast.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 10:32 pm

Will we really be able to strike pre-emptively on the street?

It all depends. Aside from the legalities involved...many of us won't first strike some huge opponent fearing that all it will accomplish is to make him really mad enough to kill you.

It also pays to come to grips with the realities that most trained people really don't have the kind of stoppage in their strikes they might think they do.

What works against some bag is no guarantee it will work against a live opponent bigger and stronger and determined to take you apart.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 10:39 pm

Another critical point to keep at the top of your Uechi defense list…is the very real possibility that you will be facing a knife.

Many times you won't see the knife and you won't even know you have been stabbed until after the fight is over.
KNIVES ARE UBIQUITOUS. Look out!

Street criminals can hide knives or edged weapons anywhere. Here are just a few possible locations: In newspapers, magazines, shopping bags, briefcases, pockets, tote bags, wallets, purses, hats, sleeves, shoes, socks, belts, automobiles, motorcycles, under their arms, behind their forearms or in books.

Sam Franco

And how will the attack come?
For example, there is a stabbing motion that punctures human tissue and is more likely to be fatal. Stab knife wounds produce internal damage and bleeding.

The other type of knife attack wound is the slash. Unless the cut severs a major artery, it is not as immediately threatening as a stab knife wound. Stabbing and slashing motions can be executed from a variety of knife grips, stances and postures.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Thu Aug 06, 2020 10:43 pm

People naturally freeze up when they are faced with a knife attack and or are quickly hit by a massive adrenaline dump that will wipe out your fine motor skills you will need to intercept a fast pumping blade in many lines of direction coming at you.

You will experience the deleterious effects of fear, anxiety, and stress.
Knife attack defenses are not easy. In fact, the odds are strongly stacked against your survival if you are unarmed and attacked by an assailant with a knife. Never underestimate the danger of a knife; it could cost you your life.

Franco

I tell my students to run from a knife if at all possible, but what if you have no choice and must fight?

KNIFE ATTACK DEFENSE: NEVER KICK AT A KNIFE.

Never attempt to kick a knife out of your assailant's hand. This is asinine and hazardous for the following reasons:

(1) The speed of your kick is no match for the speed of a knife attack; (2) To successfully hit your assailant’s knife hand, you will be required to execute a high-line kick which is suicide in any type of physical street fight confrontation;

(3) You run the risk of losing your balance and falling on the ground; (4) It unnecessarily exposes your vital targets to the knife-wielding assailant;

(5) It temporarily inhibits your ability to execute quick and evasive knife defense footwork; (6) Your assailant can cut your ankle, foot or calf when you deliver the kick.

Franco
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:52 am

People have practiced for hours in martial arts classes against fake knives, using a variety of techniques, then found themselves in situations where very little of that training came in to play.
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