Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 07, 2020 3:54 am

But there are situations people have faced where getting away is not an option. If you absolutely have to defend yourself against a knife attack, here are some tips:

• Kick low.
kicks to the assailant's foot, shin, or knee cap keeps you at a safer range than if you try to defend with your hands.

And keeping your kicks low means keeping your leg out of range of the knife.

The knee cap is the safest to attack because it keeps you furthest away from the knife.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 07, 2020 10:02 am

This is from Tim Larkin:

"As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Hi Van,

This past week I've been working on new Military and Law Enforcement training curriculums as we get ready to announce some long-requested seminar dates exclusively for these clients.

While putting together my notes I've read through literally hundreds of case studies and 'after-action' reports.

And I'm shocked by how apt the above Emerson quote is when it comes to how the military and LEO's are trained to deal with kill-or-be-killed violence (reread the Emerson quote again before continuing).

There are so many incidents to choose from to illustrate my point but here's the 'Reader's Digest™' version of 2 such events...

Karabilah, Iraq, 2004

This first one was brought to my attention by a Marine who contacted us a short time ago about training. He relayed the story of Medal Of Honor winner, Cpl. Jason L. Dunham:

On 14 April 2004, in the town of Karabilah, Iraq, Cpl Dunham's 3-man unit stopped a car suspected of ambushing a nearby convoy. One of the insurgents leaped out of the car and attacked Cpl. Dunham who wrestled him to the ground.

In the struggle that ensued Dunham saw the insurgent release a grenade and Dunham selflessly threw his body on the grenade preventing the shrapnel from hitting his fellow marines. He and the insurgent died from the grenade blast.

What's not documented in the MOH citation are the statements from the other 2 marines in Dunham's unit.

The reason they did NOT assist Dunham was because...

...he was 'winning' the wrestling match with the insurgent.

Think about it. The insurgent is there to KILL the enemy... not compete in a wrestling match.

And the other 2 Marines could have easily helped Dunham subdue the insurgent.

Instead, they got caught up watching a wrestling match and allowed a dedicated killer to deploy a grenade.

Cpl. Dunham's heroic act of sacrificing his life to protect his fellow marines could easily have been avoided if the correct training had simply been in place.

Had the insurgent come out firing a gun, all 3 marines would have returned fire. Yet as soon as it became a "wrestling match" the situation quickly morphed into time to watch your buddy "tap him out".
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 07, 2020 6:14 pm

Preparing for Surprises

It is well understood within the law enforcement training community that fine motor skills diminish as stress levels increase.

The loss of fine motor skills thereby reduces proficiency in defensive tactics that require grabbing, pivoting, completing a series of steps to a technique, or deciding proper amounts of pressure to apply.

As adrenaline activates the body's survival mechanisms, an individual loses sensitivity in the hands and feet.

Therefore, techniques that seem simple in a training environment may be nearly impossible to execute in a street encounter.


Defensive maneuvers should be based on gross motor skills that use large muscle groups and follow natural patterns, so that the ability of the person to execute the moves will not deteriorate as arousal levels increase.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:03 am

And then we have this:

Weapons and "Self-Protection" Devices Prove Ineffective Against Crime!
You probably already know that the statistics on crime are not in your favor.

•Crime statistics show everyone will experience a violent crime at one time or another
•Everyone knows someone who has been a victim of a violent crime.
•You are probably thinking that it's just a matter of time until it is your turn!


You may be thinking, "Well, I'll just get a gun!" Unfortunately, real-world tests have shown that overall, "self-defense" products are generally ineffective when it comes to self-defense. Why?


There are many factors that contribute, but the main reason weapons are ineffective is, if the gun, or other device, is not in your hand at the moment of attack, you will never get the chance to use it!

Even if you have a stun gun or pepper spray in your purse or pocket, if caught by surprise, you won't have a chance to get it out before you get decked!

Mace does you no good if it is still in the purse that just got snatched out of your hand! Tests prove that 90% of the time, you will never get the chance to reach for your weapon before you are hurt too severely to use it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:04 am

Criminals may be dumb, but they’re not stupid.
Criminals are well aware of the Second Amendment and know that any victim they chose may potentially have a gun. That means they are already one step ahead of you.

They already know what to do if you pull out (or even reach for) a weapon, and running away is not always part of their plan.

FBI statistics and Police reports from all over the country show that in more than half of all instances where the victim was able to get to a "weapon" (usually sprays are mentioned), the attacker knocked it out of their hand before they could use it.

Police files are filled with tens of thousands of incidents of weapons taken away from the victim and used against them! It is estimated that almost one third of all gunshot victims are shot with their own gun! The figures are even higher when it comes to stun-guns and sprays.


This doesn't even include all of the incidences where the victims shoot themselves!



You may be your own worst enemy
Accidental discharge is the leading cause of gunshot wounds in both crime and non-crime reports. You may think that wouldn't happen to you, but the reports prove that it happens to even experienced gun owners.

I know of a Police officer, even after extensive training, the first time he tried to use mace against an unruly suspect, ended up spraying himself.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 08, 2020 4:06 am

Unfortunately, most people have little or no training as to the safe and proper use of the weapons in their possession.

What do you think will happen when they attempt to use that weapon under the stress of a real attack? Inadequate, or even improper training is the leading cause of accidental discharge involving guns, stun-guns and sprays.


There are literally millions of incidents reported where the victim couldn't get the device to work at all, mainly because of inadequate training! Even the most basic principles of weapon usage are often overlooked by owners. The figures are stunning (I couldn't resist the pun) of the number of incidents of stun guns that didn't work when needed because of dead batteries!


There are thousands upon thousands of reports of guns that wouldn't fire because the "safety" was on, and the user didn't know, forgot, or was too panicked to figure it out in time. In at least one incident I am aware of, the victim couldn't get his weapon to fire before the criminal took it away from him. Lucky for him, the criminal couldn't figure it out either.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Sat Aug 08, 2020 10:15 am

It is for this very reason that I developed the IRL (In Real Life) drill at the HUT. Just six natural, gross-motor moves that have been field-proven by members of our group.

I reversed the usual logic; rather than learn an exotic kata move and then figure out how to apply it I took some basic self-defense reactions that people have actually done in real life and worked them into a simple, repetitive drill.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Aug 08, 2020 1:58 pm

That is most excellent Paul.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 09, 2020 4:18 am

Work the high percentage....
...techniques....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWWqDqOVxDc

These techniques are simple and they work...and should be drilled in every class.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Aug 09, 2020 5:56 pm

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Aug 10, 2020 3:17 am

When and if you are attacked, accurately telling whether the threat is in a social violence or predatory violence mindset is critical. Lastly, most of what people train for and have experience in are very specific levels of social violence.

The appropriate skills for those experiences are not good survival choices at other levels of social violence or in predatory assault.
Rory

I guess we all need to know our limitations, and knowing this is an indispensable survival technique. From my investigations of real life attacks upon people supposedly trained in martial arts, even champion fighters [recall the gangbanger attack on a tournament champion who ended up almost decapitated] the biggest problem was not to come to grips with their limitations and fighting when they should have run, and the taking on of opponents they had no business confronting.

Recall the other case i reported where a 'self styled' martial artist tried to choke a guy behind a pizza shop counter only to end up with a 12 knife thru his liver.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 14, 2020 4:55 am

Choosing to carry[weapons]

Weapons hold a special allure for many people, particularly those concerned with their personal safety.

Numerous books and DVDs on using weapons for self-defense are released every year, covering everything from knives and guns, to flashlights, key chains, and other objects.

Some purchase weapons on the advice of martial arts or self-defense instructors; other purchase them under the belief that having the weapon obviates the need for any training.

Unfortunately, many people who make these purchases fail to take the time to consider the various moral, ethical, and legal ramifications of choosing to carry or use a weapon.

These people throw a knife in their pocket, or a can of pepper spray in their purse, and trot out to Fenway Park, confident that they are ready to protect themselves.

In reality, they are preparing themselves for disaster.

This series will examine some of the issues surrounding the choice to carry a weapon. It is not intended as a comprehensive guide, but as a starting point. Do not make this decision lightly.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 14, 2020 4:57 am

When it comes to weapons, there are a lot of things to talk about. Some are big picture issues, others are more technical.

We're going to start with the big picture issues. Specifically, we're going to start with morality.

Warning. This particular column may be rather graphic.

Let's start by defining some terms.

Wikipedia defines a weapon as "a tool used to apply force for the purpose of causing harm or damage to persons, animals or structures." Merriam-Webster defines it as "something (as a club, knife, or gun) used to injure, defeat, or destroy."

Read that again. A weapon is used to "injure, defeat, or destroy."


One of the most important decisions you must make in regards to carrying a weapon is this--are you prepared for the moral, ethical, and psychological consequences of using that weapon to harm or kill another human being?
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 14, 2020 4:59 am

Do you believe that there are times when it is justifiable to take a human life? Shooting someone with a gun may do just that. So can stabbing or cutting someone with a knife. A well-placed blow from a heavy baton can kill.

Even less-than-lethal tools can result in death: an allergic reaction to pepper spray will kill just as easily as a bullet in the head (a student at Emerson College in downtown Boston was killed several years ago by a misfired pepper canister).

Picking a target that "just disables" the bad guy is for the movies. According to Demi Barbito, head of the Center for Self-Preservation Training,

"There is no human being alive who can control the amount of damage done to an aggressive attacker with a knife. "
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Fri Aug 14, 2020 5:34 am

And knives do damage. A lot of it. Damage that is ugly and bloody and messy. Are you comfortable with the idea of having someone bleeding all over you?

Of actually watching, or even feeling a person die in your hands? Are you okay with the idea that with one simple trigger pull, another human being will cease to exist?

These questions, believe it or not, don't have right answers. The decision to carry a weapon is one that is entirely in your hands.

But before you worry about training, laws, or the many other factors that we'll talk about as this series goes on, start with your basic ethics.

If you aren't okay with the ultimate consequences of using a weapon on another human being, then you've got no business carrying one.
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