Good talk on blocks

Sensei Canna offers insight into the real world of self defense!

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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:14 am

This from Lethal force trainers who have better tactical know how and deeper understanding of what happens to your mind in a fight, than martial arts teachers:
Convulsive tensing of the body tends to induce a similar condition of the mind, with all the characteristic occlusion that follows.

As William James wrote a century ago, ‘We don't so much run away because we are scared, as we are scared because we run away.'

Posture influences attitude. A cramped, tensed, and inflexible posture engenders a similar condition in the mind."


So if you are still performing sanchin with a 'convulsive tensing' of the body, you are doing it all wrong.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:17 am

How to comport yourself in public.
Personal appearance should always be well groomed and personal demeanor always polite and courteous.

However, it is to your advantage to wear clothing with neutral tones (no bright colors) and never any jewelry.

Personal demeanor, while polite, should be dull and boring. All conversation with strangers needs to be brief and colorless.

Disengagement is the prime goal and should be accomplished quickly. You should be the one that no one ever seems to remember!

There are no guarantees in this life! All we can do is try to stack the odds in our favor.

It is usually the naive, careless, and inattentive who are selected for victimization.

The prudent will quietly slip under the radar and be on their way.


/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:20 am

Gabe Suarez

The O.O.D.A. Cycle –

Second in line is the concept of the Observe – Orient – Decide – Act cycle first codified by the late Col. John Boyd.

This cycle describes how men process information in combat, we all Observe the enemy.

We Orient ourselves in accordance to the situation, as well as with what we observe.

We make a Decision based on the prior two steps, and finally we Act upon it.

All of these steps take time, and as short as that time may be in a fight, there are gaps in the timing and chinks in the process that can be identified and exploited.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:22 am

Self-defense shootings are COMBAT situations. I've seen numerous self-inflicted wounds caused by panic and fear.

All of the training and range time went down the tubes when the "rubber met the road" in real situations. Remember, combat is altogether different than shooting at paper targets that don't shoot back!

One of my old partners was a "distinguished expert" at the police range. His first shooting in a real life situation NEARLY cost him his right foot! He fired a total of six rounds, with only two of those rounds striking the bad guy who was shooting back.


His first round hit the ground just a couple of inches in front of his own right foot, after he had drawn and fired. The second round went between the legs of the bad guy.


His third round nearly "circumcized" the bad guy, but merely went through his trousers. Fourth round was in the lower abdomen, and the fifth round was in the "10 ring".

Round #6 was a "flyer", probably over the bad guys shoulder. Fortunately, #5 round was a mortal strike, plus it knocked the bad guy off-balance.

Distance of that shoot-out? Within 6 feet! The bad guy fired three rounds, all to the right! The coroner stated that the bad guy probably fired #3 round due to the "death grip".
/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:25 am

TIP #3 - MOVE ALONG A TRIANGLE
(a bit of theory)

There is one tip about self-defense that is so important that entire martial arts systems are based upon it.

The tip?
Don't get hit!

I mention that, because moving along a triangle goes a long way toward achieving the goal of not getting hit.

One of the most dangerous mistakes the average person makes during a fight is to move in straight lines. They will move in a straight line, either forward and backward, or side to side.


Imagine a vertical dividing line along your body, dividing your body into left and right halves. The aggressor is probably going to attack some point along or around that line: your face, your throat, your heart, your groin.

Moving in a straight line backward or forward will change the distance you are from your attacker, but it does not move your centerline out of the attack path.

Moving laterally (left or right) will change the location of your centerline, but it does not change the distance between you and your attacker.

Your attacker has mentally committed to striking at a particular target. His brain has sent the signal to his fist that your face, your throat, your heart, or your groin (the target he intends to hit) is located at a particular distance out there in a particular direction. When you change the target's coordinates, it spoils the effectiveness of the attack.

Your goal is to move that line of your body out of the path of the attack AND change the distance of the target from your attacker.

Your attacker may be able to recover from a change in target location or a change in target distance alone, but changing both factors is your best bet. Then, even if it does connect, the strength of the attack will be greatly diminished.

Moving along an imaginary triangle changes BOTH.

** * *

*

** * *

Imagine standing with both feet on the pointed end of a triangle and facing the bad guy. The other two points of the triangle can either be in front of you or behind you.

Each of the other triangle points are only about one medium-large step away from where you are now. One point is found one step forward and to the left. Then there's another point one step forward and to the right. Behind you one point of the triangle is one step backward and to the left. The other point is one step backward and to the right.

All you have to do is step one foot onto either of the two available triangle points in front of you or behind you. What have you done to the distance to and the location of the attacker's original target?

Bingo!
You have changed BOTH your direction, and your distance.

Simply bring your other foot up, and you are now at the starting point of another triangle. Use this concept every time you move and you will continue to confuse your attacker.
/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:33 am

TIP #4 - ALWAYS ADVANCE
WHEN YOU SHOULD RETREAT

During a fight, as during a game of chess, the experienced player is already planning the second or third move before the first one is ever completed. In fact, many of the experienced fighters' moves are used solely to get the opponent to react in a predetermined manner.

Fight you own instinct and do not back up.

Your instinct is wrong!
For example, imagine I am throwing a flurry of jabs at you. In my mind, I "know" exactly what you are going to do: backpedal to escape my vicious attack.

In fact, I am counting upon you backpedaling into that corner behind you, then I'll pound you into a liquid, right? How surprised am I going to be when you step forward, along your trusty triangle, and not backward?

I would be very surprised because you are not "supposed" to step into a savage attack; You are "supposed" to step away from it.

Look at this scenario. You've just stepped forward along the triangle. While your attacker is busy trying to adjust his thinking to handle this unexpected event you are now inside his defenses.

You now have access to his unprotected ribs, armpit, neck, head, abdomen, flank, and knee -- Suddenly YOU have a virtual smorgasbord of targets.
/John
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:26 am

You never know a person until you see them under extreme stress, so don't give them something to hold over you and ruin you before that time. You owe it to yourself, your spouse, your kids, and that nice vacation you want to take with the company bonus later in the year to keep total separation between your "martial life" and your "work life."
Suarez Intnl

This is very good advice that should apply to all our relationships with 'friends'...

It is a sad fact of life that friends really cannot be trusted 100%...many times, sooner or later, they will turn on you. Be friendly while keeping people at arms' length always.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:28 am

A quote from long ago and far away:
"Only trust those who stand to lose as much as you when things go bad."
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:11 pm

Empty Hand Knife Defense

Chris McKaskell »

Old, old history: on two occasions I’ve known people to be stabbed or slashed and on three occasions I’ve had the knife directed at me: the first time I ran away; the second I knew the fellow and figured he was simply bluffing so I kept my distance and talked him down;

the third time (the one I recently posted on another thread) I froze then found myself at the mercy of a goon. I should probably add to the list that the older brother of a school friend was stabbed to death in Toronto, but I only knew him through association – he was much older and living the difficult life of a street person.

Thankfully, my experience with these sorts of events is quite limited: nevertheless, I still find I have to agree with Van when he suggests: “Defense against a knife attack is mostly BS.” (note: I’ve taken this statement somewhat out of context – check ‘what I could have done vs. what I did’ to see it in context)

Nevertheless, I would really appreciate your comments/observations/experiences on this matter.

Likewise, if there are any other sources of information that you might know – books (Van and Bill recently mentioned a ‘companion pair’ :P that I look forward to reading), DVDs, videos, all suggestions are welcome.

And I’m sure it must come up; so, how do you approach this very important material with your students?

I was once told that Uechi adapts very well to knife work/defense. What do you think?

Chris
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:14 pm

MikeK »

Very recently I received Jerry Wetzel's two Red Zone knife defense videos. They focus on the "average" knife wielder and not Leo Gaje which is nice and more realistic. On volume two their main moves are identical to some main moves I use and learned when we were still using Shotokan as a base. They don't use the environment as much as I'd like, but still a nice addition to whatever else you're doing that emphasizes simplicity.

http://knifedefense.blogspot.com/



Intro to the Red Zone Program
The Red Zone program is the name given to the empty hand weapon defense program we teach at Centerline Gym. Our approach to weapons defense focuses much more on depth of knowledge than accumulation of techniques. All of the techniques employed are gross motor which helps to make them more easily accessible in the heat of a confrontation. If we try to rely too heavily on fine or complex motor skills we will be in trouble when things go bad.

The goal in any weapons defense program that has any connection to reality is to exit the situation as soon as possible. In many cases, those who claim to teach edged weapon defense pay lip service to avoidance and escape and then spend an inordinate amount of time showing intricate (and highly inappropriate) disarms and counters. In the Red Zone program escape is not an afterthought, it is the entire focus. This means that all of our techniques and training methods revolve around creating a window of escape at the earliest opportunity.

Having said that, there are definite hands on skills that can greatly reduce the amount of damage we suffer should we have to go hands on. The main objective in our method (when escape is not an immediate possibility) is to gain control of the weapon bearing limb. This is achieved a few different ways depending on the type of attack. Once we have a hold of the weapon bearing limb we have to establish a dominant control position from which we can counter attack. To this end we utilize a few different positions such as the baseball bat, and the modified 2-on-1 . These positions can be transitioned through to deal with the rapidly evolving situation much in the same way Brazilian Jiu Jitsu utilizes positional control in order to strike and submit. Once a control position has be achieved, we can work to attack the attacker and end the confrontation.

Beyond the physical aspects of the program, we also work to dispel common myths regarding knife defense (we will get to some of these later). Also covered is force on force training and dealing with various types of static attacks (knife at throat etc.)

The 2 DVD's which cover the Red Zone program have sold all over the world. The RZ program is currently being taught in law enforcement and military groups throughout the world. The feedback has been tremendous. We will continue to post updates to the program as well as training insights here which can help to supplement the material taught on the DVD series.

The videos are currently available at www.centerlinegym.com

Enjoy,

Jerry
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:23 pm

Watching this video confirms what I wrote about most knife defense techniques being BS.

We see here the brutality of intent of a ‘knifer’ _ the mind numbing _overwhelming _ “kill” coming at you, the natural instinct to protect by going to cover with your arms and getting stabbed anyway by the repeated plunging strokes never ending.

As I wrote before _ I saw a man killed in the manner of the video _ once _back in the old country. Something hard to forget.

You also see in the video what has the better chance of dealing with a blade attack.

You must turn into a beast and hope that you can finish the job before you get stabbed too many times.

You also see the ‘nature of the enemy’ in the clip. What you will probably be up against in a street fight, and with a weapon most likely.

The reason why I caution about ‘knife defenses’ sanchin arms etc.

Watch the clip again.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Mon Nov 11, 2019 5:32 pm

Ted Sochin
Myth 1: The criminal knifer will square off with you, giving you time to assess his style, plan your moves and just plain get ready.

Reality 1: An criminal knifer will not usually show his blade to you or anyone else before he tries to bury it in your gut. He is trying to murder you and will not advertise the fact.

Most martial arts and military styles of knife work were developed in a lawless society or where the soldier was the law. Today’s reality is that cutting someone is illegal and the knife work that has come out of the North American prisons reflects that reality. The ambush and the sucker strike are here to stay.

The person who waves his knife in your face wants something from you: your fear, your money or for you to leave him alone.

In this situation you will have a martial arts response available, but it will be incredibly difficult compared to the ease he will have killing you.

The martial arts attitude that they have a technique with a perfect chance of winning in such a situation is a myth.

It might be better to avail yourself of the Nike defence and boot it, or at lest give him what he wants while you practice your de-escalation techniques for survival.

If you like to wander on those parts of the map where it says "dragons be here" you’d better have a reflexive response ready for the ambush.


Myth 2: After he shows you his knife and his intent, the knifer will use the knife like a long-range weapon: i.e. he will hold it in his forward hand and lunge into a slash. Or, he will thrust with full body movement, extending his knife hand as he moves with a major body part (read: a killing blow to heart, lungs or neck) as his target.

Reality 2: Let alone the fact that it is pretty hard for a knifer to keep his intentions to kill you a secret with a full driving lunge attack, none of the Oriental martial arts knife work I’ve been involved with have taught this approach to killing; they are notorious for slicing and dicing before they finish (this includes Chinese, Korean, Japanese and Filipino styles).

Even the military styles are taught to cut their way in and to cut their way back out–taking all targets of opportunity on their way.

American prison style of shanking with only the point (no edge) does not usually drive in this way either. See the review: Put ’Em Down, Take ’Em Out!: Knife Fighting Techniques From Folsom Prison by Don Pentecost and Surviving A Street Knife Fight: Realistic Defensive Techniques by Marc "Animal" MacYoung.



The full body, lunging style of attack seems to be a movie style that was developed to be able to show clearly what was happening on the screen to the best advantage, and has been pictured a thousand times in the "Do it this way (and die)" martial arts rags, I mean mags.

Where you may see a lunge attack is in the ambush or surprise attack, where the extra distance is seen by the attacker as a safety zone.

This may be used by someone who is feeling secure that he is not going to be seen or who is too enraged to care.

When the knifer combines the ambush with a lunge attack, using strongest-weapon-to-major-target principle, the victim (you) is surprised, caught off balance, not in fight mode and very vulnerable.

Therefore, your training must include defences from surprise lunge attacks. But, due to the fact that other types of attacks are more probable, especially if you are being confronted with a knifer who wants to hide his stuff, training against the other types of attacks must be learned and drilled.


Myth 3: The myth of the frozen hand. This is actually two myths because it can apply to both the knife hand and to the attacker’s free hand. It means that once you have blocked his knife hand, he either leaves it out there for you to ju jitsu all over, or he does not involve his free hand at all.

Reality 3: The knife you block can cut its way back out of your reach as fast as it came in, it can twirl and cut up your hand, it can "tip-rip" your forearm. His other hand can tear out an eye or give you a thought provoking shot in the throat.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:46 am

Ted
I was taught three principles of Oriental knife work:

* hypnotise with the blade, kill with the free hand
* flash the knife to get a defensive block into place, then cut it
* starting with the closest target, cut your way in, then cut your way back out, wait for blood loss and shock to give you a chance to make a finish.

As for the prison style attacks, it is much more direct with less flash and slash without the disadvantages of the lunge attack. It depends upon the proper use of the free hand to catch and pull the victim in close where the knife can be used "discretely." (Various youtube vids perport to show such knifings but they look staged to me.)

Myth 4:
"You get close to fight a knife so you must rush a knife."

AND:
“Keeping well away from a knife is your only advantage.”

The Contradiction: The get close myth only applies to those with a choice who do not have a duty to engage nor a distance weapon of their own. If you are surprised and he is already in close then you must fight. If you have a duty to engage and must close in, long range solutions cannot be considered.

The get close tactic is a myth when applied to the untrained who have no need to engage who might believe that they should rush at the knifer because they will die if they try to run away.

Reality 4: The knife is a short range weapon and if you choose to fight in its range the chances are you will lose. For sure you will get cut.
Unless you must fight the knife, you should stay away and fight from long range with long-range weapons, like canes, chairs, garbage cans and thrown objects.


It doesn’t matter if the bad guy is trained or not, he must get close to you to cut you, and once he is close, he can cut you.

There is no power needed for cutting - the knife has all the power. All the knifer provides is a delivery system and the knife can come in at incredibly high speed with erratic motions. Do you really want to walk into a blender?

Three times I have faced an angry person who grabbed a knife and pointed it at me to keep me back. This was the nature of my work environment. Three times I held my ground and did not rush in, thankfully.

Each time the person was not interested in cutting me as much as just leveling the playing field and showing me that he too, had some power. Each time I chose to talk to him, rather than rush in to disarm him.

My message was that since he had escalated into life and death combat by grabbing the knife, I could not guarantee his safety or that he would not get hurt if he forced me to fight for my life. Each time they put the knife down and we went on with our negotiation.

Rushing in might have been the end of everything for me…

On the other hand: you do what you must.

If you must fight in close, then you must control the delivery system with a sharp strike to his wrist or a simple arm wrap, (cqc), grabs, (Peyton Quinn), or the Pat, Wrap and Attack system, (Darren Laur ), all followed up by a devastating barrage of strikes.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby Van Canna » Tue Nov 12, 2019 7:50 am

Ted

Myth 5: "You can take a cut while you kill him,"
or, "While he’s cutting me, I’ll be killing him."


Reality 5: The one-shot kill is so hard to pull off on a fresh and committed opponent that you can’t count on it, as the so called no holds barred fighting has proven. Of course it’s available but if it fails you are in deep doo-doo while you are inside his range, cut and in shock. This is not where you want to be.

It may be that your thoughts are: “He’ll get one cut but I will pound him to submission with a thousand blows.” But if you go into shock, your plan will not work.

The problem of shock relates to the body’s natural dismay at being invaded by a foreign object; it has nothing to do with how tough you are. A deep cut in a minor place like the forearm may stop you in your tracks due to physiological responses outside your control.


I have heard about a teacher who gets his students to relax, knocks the wind out of them and then forces them to defend themselves. That is a bit of what the shock will be like. The shock of the cut on your forearm may give him the opportunity to sink his putt in your gut.

Sacrificing an arm to avoid a kill shot to the throat is a smart move, but it is inherently risky to intentionally take a cut just to set up your own shot, no matter how many others have successfully done it.
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Re: Good talk on blocks

Postby paulg » Tue Nov 12, 2019 11:50 am

Let us remember that one of our senior teachers was attacked several years ago by an assailant with a gun. He grabbed the gun hand with both of his hands and held on for dear life, trying to twist and hold the gun away from his center. He survived, but just barely. When we talked after he had recovered he said he was focused one hundred percent on holding the gun hand... it was quite impossible for him to do ANY OTHER MOVES such as chops or kicks or knees or anything else that we had drilled ad infinitum. What he did was the natural and primordial defense, and we should know that that is just what we would do as well in a similar situation. I once did a training exercise at the Hut in which I held a real knife (not a rubber toy), told the class I was not going to slash or stab or do anything but just hold it out, and I wanted them to grab my wrist with both hands and HOLD IT HARD. Afterwards we talked about the experience. Every one of the students said the same thing: they were very nervous (one advanced student even refused to try the exercise), their energy and attention was entirely and solely focused on the knife. There was no possibility of 'mushin', calm soul, James Bond or any other fancy moves or masterful state of mind. AND THIS WAS WITH SOMEONE THEY KNEW WELL, TRUSTED AND HAD TOLD THEM THERE WOULD BE NO ATTACK OTHER THAN JUST STANDING THERE HOLDING THE KNIFE! So imagine that scenario with a stranger, in an alley, who is actually bent on really attacking.

So this is what I think: the practice we do in the dojo serves to calm us and make us feel temporarily safe ( then the anxieties of the ordinary day build and we need to practice again, and then again.) This is of great value in our day to day lives, even if we would actually revert to the much more primitive and basic moves in a real situation. Fortunately, few of us ever encounter the 'real situation.' Some people have seen the IRL (In Real Life) drill we developed at the Hut; six very basic "go-to" moves that we drill repeatedly... this exercise has some of the qualities stated above. The moves are basic, gross-motor and fairly natural (even a person with no karate training would be likely to try to use them.)
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